Volunteer as Independent Custody Visitor & Gain Valuable Insight

21
Found 13th Jun
Willing to inspect, uphold detainee's rights and report bad practices in Police Custody suites and at the same time gain valuable insight into what goes on inside a police custody centre?

With hours to suit and custody centres dotted around the country, you can volunteer in your spare time.

Apply today icva.org.uk/pur…se/
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Haven't we got enough unwanted, interfering do-gooders looking after criminals' 'human rights'?

Wouldn't it be more worthwhile and productive volunteering at victim support groups?
Edited by: "deeky" 14th Jun
21 Comments
Interesting. Is it something you do?
The concept of this is brilliantly markered and appears attractive.

I was curious as this new is to me. The site icva.org.uk/about/

is completely empty of :-

1. Effectiveness performance results.
2. No measurement values of what they actually do.
3. Complete absence of volunteer contribution of effort and what objectives these volunteers work to and how do they know the objectives are met. In the following highlighted words, there is absence of any achievement data of their wish list on their web site.

How do I know, if I wanted to volunteer, that I shall achieve something purposeful and meaning to me, to the person in custody, to the society, that is measurable by quantifiable results?

In 2018, it is no longer any good, in a fake news, wish-list and broken promises world, to have a web site fronting the public with no achievements and actual effectiveness data.

On the other hand, a salaried job of £30,000/yr to £100,000/yr with no need to publish any achievements and actual effectiveness on web site is very attractive.


They said (click me):-

  • Promote and support the effective provision of independent custody visiting in police forces in the United Kingdom
  • To support independent custody visitors across England and Wales in contributing, wherever possible and appropriate, initiatives to improve conditions in police custody.
  • Ensure alignment between the local delivery of independent custody visiting and the UK’s obligations under relevant international treaties, including the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture (OPCAT) and European Human Rights legislation.
  • We are members of the UK National Preventive Mechanism (UKNPM) as required by the Optional Protocol against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (OPCAT) – an international human rights treaty designed to strengthen the protection of people deprived of their liberty.
Edited by: "splender" 13th Jun
Second part, for example, specifically, about, " inspect, uphold detainee's rights and report bad practices in Police Custody suites"

So I ask, is there a category for "upholding which types of rights" and then the frequency trend analysis of bad practices?
How the volunteers contributed to the improvement, from point A to point B in 2017;

Ensure alignment from point A to point B in 2017 etc.

And as a result of reporting bad practices, what actually happened.

There is a page of Purpose icva.org.uk/pur…se/

but no results of how purpose was actually carried out. The site is void of annual or quarterly reports on results and achievements.

If volunteer has a sense of serving something purposeful, then the fact that the purposeful achievement pays nothing suggests possibly that the purpose has not enough value to be worth of £1 an hour, say, as an arbitrary number.
Edited by: "splender" 13th Jun
splender7 h, 34 m ago

Second part, for example, specifically, about, " inspect, uphold …Second part, for example, specifically, about, " inspect, uphold detainee's rights and report bad practices in Police Custody suites"So I ask, is there a category for "upholding which types of rights" and then the frequency trend analysis of bad practices?How the volunteers contributed to the improvement, from point A to point B in 2017;Ensure alignment from point A to point B in 2017 etc.And as a result of reporting bad practices, what actually happened.There is a page of Purpose https://icva.org.uk/purpose/but no results of how purpose was actually carried out. The site is void of annual or quarterly reports on results and achievements.If volunteer has a sense of serving something purposeful, then the fact that the purposeful achievement pays nothing suggests possibly that the purpose has not enough value to be worth of £1 an hour, say, as an arbitrary number.


Splender, you ask demand some good bits of information. Sounds ICVA could do with you volunteering for them.

In short, the police in England and Wales need a complete reform and until that happens, we will need organisations such as ICVA - even if it is not to your satisfaction. The government is leaning towards privatising the police - contracting each bit of policing - from call taking, investigations, analysis, research all the way up to surveillance. Many have been using GeoAmey or Relliance for custody - but some forces can see the risks of inexperienced staff of those companies and maintain in-house personnel working in custody.

Your post hotukdeals.com/dis…267 was also interesting. When policing budget is low, it means that they cut corners, hire cheaper staff - such as civilians - to do the work of qualified professionals or experienced police officers. This all has an impact on the welfare of the detained people - specially when young police sergeants are sped up through training and have to fill other roles, such as Acting Inspector when the Inspector is away. From experience, a large amount of people are detained over the time of what is allowed, but unless their solicitor (if they asked for one) or Independent Custody Visitor deals with the matter (and demand the compensation for unlawful detention), the person will just fester until someone remembers about them in the cell.

So say it is Sunday and resources are at minimum level - suddenly there is a double stabbing in town (imagine a place smaller than London/Manchester, etc) and suspects are on the run - the area car and others on patrol start the initial search (awaiting dogs section and other ops to arrive - because due to police station closures they are now based 1-2 hour drive away). The two civilian community support workers guard the scene and then extra nearby resources are called - the police officers who were due to do the detainee's interview are then extracted to do house to house enquiries and gather CCTV evidence and the detainee is returned to cell. Custody Inspector is off. Area Inspector is now tied up with the double murder investigations and doing Bronze command duties. The clock is ticking, the detained person doesn't understand his rights so he didn't ask for a solicitor. Finally, on Monday at 0800h a custody sergeant realises the detained person was detained way beyond the 24 hour rule without a Superintendent's authorisation. They do not inform the detained person of their rights and what they've done wrong. The police makes no attempt to rectify the error. This is just one example of why ICVs are needed. It may seem to you that they don't do much, but detention officers will often approach an ICV to report health and safety issues in custody rather than report to their Sergeant - why? Because the reports from ICVs go straight to command and they act upon of what has been reported almost immediately. If a detention officer reports to their Sergeant, it is often ignored - and that is largely to do with the culture that police officers see themselves as more capable and important than civilian colleagues.

Another issue is that many civilian workers who used to do administrative roles, such as file preparation for courts or finance, were left with their jobs at risk and as a consequence, they started applying for jobs in more operational roles - such as Station Enquiry Officer at police station's front desk or Detention Officer within custody. So custody ends up with say, 3 ex-admin Detention Officers, 2 Detention Officers with aptitude for the role (able to control, restrain, act on their initiative in an emergency, seize evidence & understand the whys), a 24 year old female sergeant with an atitude and glued to her iphone and a Custody Inspector who is desperate for a Chief Inspector promotion (turning ACPO level - "The Club"). Truth of the matter is nobody wants to work in custody - they only go there to gain experience, to get overtime or if they are lost in their career choice (ex military personnel for example). Who suffers as a result of it? The public. The victim of crime and more often these day, the people who are put into a cell for convenience (excuses such as change of shifts, to prevent public order incident or because mental health team is not available). This website is a good example of the results of such police neglect inquest.org.uk .
splender8 h, 36 m ago

Second part, for example, specifically, about, " inspect, uphold …Second part, for example, specifically, about, " inspect, uphold detainee's rights and report bad practices in Police Custody suites"So I ask, is there a category for "upholding which types of rights" and then the frequency trend analysis of bad practices?How the volunteers contributed to the improvement, from point A to point B in 2017;Ensure alignment from point A to point B in 2017 etc.And as a result of reporting bad practices, what actually happened.There is a page of Purpose https://icva.org.uk/purpose/but no results of how purpose was actually carried out. The site is void of annual or quarterly reports on results and achievements.If volunteer has a sense of serving something purposeful, then the fact that the purposeful achievement pays nothing suggests possibly that the purpose has not enough value to be worth of £1 an hour, say, as an arbitrary number.


You can also make further enquiries via whatdotheyknow.com - you can also view other people's enquiries and which responses they've got on that website.
Volunteering should be for charities, hospicies, disabled kids centries or local schools etc.

Go tax some of the multinationals who cream billions out of our nation or the thousands of BTL landlords with 15 + properties who mysteriously get off the tax hook and use it to pay salaries to some able bodied unemployed people who could easily do this job.
ParadisePapers2 h, 55 m ago

Splender, you ask demand some good bits of information. Sounds ICVA could …Splender, you ask demand some good bits of information. Sounds ICVA could do with you volunteering for them. In short, the police in England and Wales need a complete reform and until that happens, we will need organisations such as ICVA - even if it is not to your satisfaction. The government is leaning towards privatising the police - contracting each bit of policing - from call taking, investigations, analysis, research all the way up to surveillance. Many have been using GeoAmey or Relliance for custody - but some forces can see the risks of inexperienced staff of those companies and maintain in-house personnel working in custody.Your post https://www.hotukdeals.com/discussions/british-policing-is-in-a-potentially-perilous-state-with-thousands-of-criminal-suspects-roaming-free-2626267 was also interesting. When policing budget is low, it means that they cut corners, hire cheaper staff - such as civilians - to do the work of qualified professionals or experienced police officers. This all has an impact on the welfare of the detained people - specially when young police sergeants are sped up through training and have to fill other roles, such as Acting Inspector when the Inspector is away. From experience, a large amount of people are detained over the time of what is allowed, but unless their solicitor (if they asked for one) or Independent Custody Visitor deals with the matter (and demand the compensation for unlawful detention), the person will just fester until someone remembers about them in the cell. So say it is Sunday and resources are at minimum level - suddenly there is a double stabbing in town (imagine a place smaller than London/Manchester, etc) and suspects are on the run - the area car and others on patrol start the initial search (awaiting dogs section and other ops to arrive - because due to police station closures they are now based 1-2 hour drive away). The two civilian community support workers guard the scene and then extra nearby resources are called - the police officers who were due to do the detainee's interview are then extracted to do house to house enquiries and gather CCTV evidence and the detainee is returned to cell. Custody Inspector is off. Area Inspector is now tied up with the double murder investigations and doing Bronze command duties. The clock is ticking, the detained person doesn't understand his rights so he didn't ask for a solicitor. Finally, on Monday at 0800h a custody sergeant realises the detained person was detained way beyond the 24 hour rule without a Superintendent's authorisation. They do not inform the detained person of their rights and what they've done wrong. The police makes no attempt to rectify the error. This is just one example of why ICVs are needed. It may seem to you that they don't do much, but detention officers will often approach an ICV to report health and safety issues in custody rather than report to their Sergeant - why? Because the reports from ICVs go straight to command and they act upon of what has been reported almost immediately. If a detention officer reports to their Sergeant, it is often ignored - and that is largely to do with the culture that police officers see themselves as more capable and important than civilian colleagues.Another issue is that many civilian workers who used to do administrative roles, such as file preparation for courts or finance, were left with their jobs at risk and as a consequence, they started applying for jobs in more operational roles - such as Station Enquiry Officer at police station's front desk or Detention Officer within custody. So custody ends up with say, 3 ex-admin Detention Officers, 2 Detention Officers with aptitude for the role (able to control, restrain, act on their initiative in an emergency, seize evidence & understand the whys), a 24 year old female sergeant with an atitude and glued to her iphone and a Custody Inspector who is desperate for a Chief Inspector promotion (turning ACPO level - "The Club"). Truth of the matter is nobody wants to work in custody - they only go there to gain experience, to get overtime or if they are lost in their career choice (ex military personnel for example). Who suffers as a result of it? The public. The victim of crime and more often these day, the people who are put into a cell for convenience (excuses such as change of shifts, to prevent public order incident or because mental health team is not available). This website is a good example of the results of such police neglect https://www.inquest.org.uk .


Excellent informative reply, tallies with my personal experience of how the public suffers with infrastructural and institutional behavioural leadership transformation as costs rises, budgets are cut, some members of public are worth less than others. Some leaders are there with no usable skills in GCSE maths and A level maths , as well as cause and effect cost calculation. Some have no usable skills in technology, and inability to reflect on management information pushed up the line with mathematical intuition, so they fail to identity issues and gaps. Where issues and gaps are identified, they have no maths skills to lead and to direct transition and transformation management actions to go from A to B.

You see this on the news daily, Grenfell refurb quality costs, Windrush data management using data from other sources like DWP's , Northern train timetable, Diesel NOx emission and why leaders did not use GCSE science to sense MOT station tests are not the same as real driving. In GCSE science, one learns one can cheat laboratory results, experience tells you too good science results may be due to manipulation.

One can always identify leadership dysunction, their web sites are always void of actual performance to back up what they claim to promise and do for the customer/public on their leadership web pages. They never have the leadership competence to tell you in their leadership journey from A to B as relevant to the readers (customers) of their web sites, what they actually achieved in perfornance results as evidence. One does not expect them to know everything, they should publish as key business assumptions for things they do not know. Critically, the promises and claims to do web pages have no links to, if you think I do not actually do what I say, click here to the CEO office. This is because a limited company, a body corporate, the CEO is the equivalent of a shop owner, when the shop owner does not do what s/he says, you ask the shop owner.

This failure was in fact well understood, that's why you have freedom of information requests, but this has severe limitations in correcting most of the dysfunctional behaviour and lack of leadership ability.
Edited by: "splender" 14th Jun
501MHZ1 h, 28 m ago

Volunteering should be for charities, hospicies, disabled kids centries or …Volunteering should be for charities, hospicies, disabled kids centries or local schools etc. Go tax some of the multinationals who cream billions out of our nation or the thousands of BTL landlords with 15 + properties who mysteriously get off the tax hook and use it to pay salaries to some able bodied unemployed people who could easily do this job.



Volunteers or no cost labour should not be for charities... free labour distorts the market forces and upset financial equilibria because charities draw on the same resources in the same environment as all businesses.

Labour should be paid at market rates, the funding should be from other means from society.
Edited by: "splender" 14th Jun
splender1 h, 7 m ago

Excellent informative reply, tallies with my personal experience of how …Excellent informative reply, tallies with my personal experience of how the public suffers with infrastructural and institutional behavioural leadership transformation as costs rises, budgets are cut, some members of public are worth less than others. Some leaders are there with no usable skills in GCSE maths and A level maths , as well as cause and effect cost calculation. Some have no usable skills in technology, and inability to reflect on management information pushed up the line with mathematical intuition, so they fail to identity issues and gaps. Where issues and gaps are identified, they have no maths skills to lead and to direct transition and transformation management actions to go from A to B.You see this on the news daily, Grenfell refurb quality costs, Windrush data management using data from other sources like DWP's , Northern train timetable, Diesel NOx emission and why leaders did not use GCSE science to sense MOT station tests are not the same as real driving. In GCSE science, one learns one can cheat laboratory results, experience tells you too good science results may be due to manipulation. One can always identify leadership dysunction, their web sites are always void of actual performance to back up what they claim to promise and do for the customer/public on their leadership web pages. Critically, the promises and claims to do web pages have no links to, if you think we do not actually do what we say, click here to the CEO. This failure was in fact well understood, that's why you have freedom of information requests, but this has limitations to correct most of the dysfunctional behaviour.


The term "police family" doesn't help the situation. It does have an incestuous tinge to it also, as sex is often used as commodity among police colleagues - a way to build trust and gain control over another I would say. Not that it does not happen in other professions, but in the police has a maliciousness behind it and it is not uncommon for an entire traffic unit, to have slept with the same female police officer. Sex helps women to get promotion and being a freemason helps men to get promotion within the police.

When you have a group of people so entwined (and I never saw similar bonds in other professions), they will cover up things for each other. And if anyone from their group dares to denounce them, then they are harassed with drones by their home windows and the full force of unauthorised surveillance. The Police Federation and each individual force will turn a blind - hence why there are so few English & Welsh police whistleblowers - if the person has a family, they will simply destroy their reputation - and they know how because they can access all the databases, IMSI catchers and CCTVs one can think of. It is vampirism - the person must turn into a vampire in order to be part of that family.

I agree with @501MHZ 's comment - the police nowadays recruits volunteers for administrative roles and they've been recruiting Special Constables (police officers volunteers) for a very long time. The state cannot count on goodwill to run a service. Police officers get themselves comfortable because it is nearly impossible to sack a high rank police officer for mismanagement or incompetence - which then leads to overspending, having to recruit volunteers to their job and inevitably a dodgy deal or two when deciding which companies will supply uniform and vehicles to their force. They know the maximum thing they get is a slap on the wrist - the current Metropolitan police chief even got a promotion for ordering the brutal murder of Jean Charles de Menezes - an innocent man. The whole world saw that and she still got away with it.

I wish we could trust our police to do the right thing, but more often than not they don't. That is why organisations such as the ICVA exists - they could do better, yes, for sure.
ParadisePapers13 m ago

The term "police family" doesn't help the situation. It does have an …The term "police family" doesn't help the situation. It does have an incestuous tinge to it also, as sex is often used as commodity among police colleagues - a way to build trust and gain control over another I would say. Not that it does not happen in other professions, but in the police has a maliciousness behind it and it is not uncommon for an entire traffic unit, to have slept with the same female police officer. Sex helps women to get promotion and being a freemason helps men to get promotion within the police.When you have a group of people so entwined (and I never saw similar bonds in other professions), they will cover up things for each other. And if anyone from their group dares to denounce them, then they are harassed with drones by their home windows and the full force of unauthorised surveillance. The Police Federation and each individual force will turn a blind - hence why there are so few English & Welsh police whistleblowers - if the person has a family, they will simply destroy their reputation - and they know how because they can access all the databases, IMSI catchers and CCTVs one can think of. It is vampirism - the person must turn into a vampire in order to be part of that family.I agree with @501MHZ 's comment - the police nowadays recruits volunteers for administrative roles and they've been recruiting Special Constables (police officers volunteers) for a very long time. The state cannot count on goodwill to run a service. Police officers get themselves comfortable because it is nearly impossible to sack a high rank police officer for mismanagement or incompetence - which then leads to overspending, having to recruit volunteers to their job and inevitably a dodgy deal or two when deciding which companies will supply uniform and vehicles to their force. They know the maximum thing they get is a slap on the wrist - the current Metropolitan police chief even got a promotion for ordering the brutal murder of Jean Charles de Menezes - an innocent man. The whole world saw that and she still got away with it.I wish we could trust our police to do the right thing, but more often than not they don't. That is why organisations such as the ICVA exists - they could do better, yes, for sure.



Whilst I agree with your general principle of apparent co-operation way beyond the scope of their job function which is to do work objectively for the public, I do not agree with the graphic specific examples without further analysis.
Omg
Haven't we got enough unwanted, interfering do-gooders looking after criminals' 'human rights'?

Wouldn't it be more worthwhile and productive volunteering at victim support groups?
Edited by: "deeky" 14th Jun
deeky3 h, 3 m ago

Haven't we got enough unwanted, interfering do-gooders looking after …Haven't we got enough unwanted, interfering do-gooders looking after criminals' 'human rights'?Wouldn't it be more worthwhile and productive volunteering at victim support groups?



I think there are at least 4 types of help:

1. Criminals who need judicial and human rights,

2. Innocents who are wrongly classed as criminals need judicial and human rights,

3. Victims who need human rights and support , victimsupport.org.uk

4. Victims who are wrongly classed as criminals, also need help.

In 3, as per my two long comments above, you will struggle to find mathematical and quantitative effectiveness reports and key performance indicators to substantiate what they promised to do and what they actually did on their web site.
splender14 m ago

I think there are at least 4 types of help:1. Criminals who need judicial …I think there are at least 4 types of help:1. Criminals who need judicial and human rights,2. Innocents who are wrongly classed as criminals need judicial and human rights,3. Victims who need human rights and support , https://www.victimsupport.org.uk4. Victims who are wrongly classed as criminals, also need help.In 3, as per my two long comments above, you will struggle to find mathematical and quantitative effectiveness reports and key performance indicators to substantiate what they promised to do and what they actually did on their web site.



If anyone can find mathematical and quantitative effectiveness reports and key performance indicators to substantiate what they promised to do and what they actually did on their web site, @deeky can.
Saturn20 m ago

If anyone can find mathematical and quantitative effectiveness reports and …If anyone can find mathematical and quantitative effectiveness reports and key performance indicators to substantiate what they promised to do and what they actually did on their web site, @deeky can.


I'm on it...
Saturn59 m ago

If anyone can find mathematical and quantitative effectiveness reports and …If anyone can find mathematical and quantitative effectiveness reports and key performance indicators to substantiate what they promised to do and what they actually did on their web site, @deeky can.



There ain't any information on effectiveness, competence and value for money, that is of any use for donators and public interest, I checked.
There are some stories though.

There are three figures on the front page, victimsupport.org.uk all the numbers are defective and lack leadership and management quality control:-

34010645-lhEHh.jpg

Take the first figure , 814,000, this is a promise, offered help. There is no figure on what they actually did, was it 2,000 actually helped, 100,000 or what? If help was not delivered, how many did not get what they were offered or promised?

The dysfunctional leadership and management failed to state what they actually did, and failed to publicise a key metric, which is hours of support per person. This leave me cold in understanding, is this a 5 mins call centre support, or is it high quality hand-holding support etc.

It is not a good start for me, I am afraid, to justify my confidence.

@deeky
Edited by: "splender" 14th Jun
deeky37 m ago

I'm on it...



Don't bother , I did it. I made it very easy for you to excel , see above.
splender1 m ago

Don't bother , I did it. I made it very easy for you to excel , see above.


I was just going to post that. You stole my thunder
splender29 m ago

There ain't any information on effectiveness, competence and value for …There ain't any information on effectiveness, competence and value for money, that is of any use for donators and public interest, I checked. There are some stories though.There are three figures on the front page, victimsupport.org.uk all the numbers are defective and lack leadership and management quality control:-[Image] Take the first figure , 814,000, this is a promise offered to help. There is no figure on what they actually did, was it 2,000 actually helped, 100,000 or what? If help was not delivered, how many did not get what they were offered?The dysfunctional leadership and management failed to state what they actually did, and failed to publicise a key metric, which is hours of support per person. This leave me cold in understanding, is this a 5 mins call centre support, or is it high quality hand-holding support etc.It is not a good start for me, I am afraid, to justify my confidence.@deeky


Spot on. @deeky and I were just saying precisely the same thing. I don't think it is a good start to inspire confidence in any of us.
Hey @splender , when somebody reports a crime they are asked if they want to be contacted by Victim Support and by which method of communication. These are basic steps of crime recording and in theory you could get Victim Support for absolutely any crime committed against you. But in practice is happens more for crimes against the person or a crime which could've caused emotional trauma somewhat - such as victims of racism (sadly, too many these days).

If they chose by post, the reporting person then receives a letter offering their contact details should the person wishes to speak to Victim Support. It is almost an automated response. One would think that burglary dwelling is a type of crime which the victim will need some sort of support to overcome trauma. When I got burgled, I received the letter then gave them a call and asked what sort of help was available and their response was "What help do you need?" - so it is pretty vague. I could've answered a couple of weeks holiday on a cruise, 7 sessions of counselling or an unicorn. In any case, I asked for counselling but they never got back to me and that was the end of it - so stats would've shown that I was offered help by Victim Support - when in reality it was in geste.
ParadisePapers18 h, 8 m ago

These are basic steps of crime recording and in theory you could get …These are basic steps of crime recording and in theory you could get Victim Support for absolutely any crime committed against you. But in practice is happens more for crimes against the person or a crime which could've caused emotional trauma somewhat - such as victims of racism (sadly, too many these days).


Victims of racism? What about victims of rape (and other sexual assaults), physical assaults, robbery (with or without violence)?

The general tone of your thread, along with your highlighting of just the one type of crime against the person, tells me all I need to know about the type of person you are.
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