what does phase do on sub ???

10
Posted 3rd Sep
stuck to get best out of it......crossover too
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Phase is in or out movement. Some enclosures sound better out of phase.

crossover is the frequency that it played through the speaker or sub woofer.
Wadda03/09/2020 15:54

Phase is in or out movement. Some enclosures sound better out of phase. …Phase is in or out movement. Some enclosures sound better out of phase. crossover is the frequency that it played through the speaker or sub woofer.


how do i decide whats best????
Wadda03/09/2020 15:54

Phase is in or out movement. Some enclosures sound better out of phase. …Phase is in or out movement. Some enclosures sound better out of phase. crossover is the frequency that it played through the speaker or sub woofer.


also thats not a copy and paste thing??? i want user knowledge mate
it usually only has an impact when you have more than one. One sub on it's own will work either way round. Having two speakers (or one speaker with two subs) will make some very strange effects if they're not the same phase.

I'd suggest matching the amp's plus and minus, or I'm guessing in your case the crossover.

As for crossovers, they need to be set up according to each drivers capabilities, as well as a bit of user preference. Ideally the frequency response of one driver should roll off as the other one rolls on, but that's extremely simplified and is only a 'good place to start'. You might prefer that the larger driver can take more of the midrange to give it a bit 'more', or you might want the tweeter to only deal with the very highest frequencies.
slimy3103/09/2020 16:12

it usually only has an impact when you have more than one. One sub on it's …it usually only has an impact when you have more than one. One sub on it's own will work either way round. Having two speakers (or one speaker with two subs) will make some very strange effects if they're not the same phase. I'd suggest matching the amp's plus and minus, or I'm guessing in your case the crossover.As for crossovers, they need to be set up according to each drivers capabilities, as well as a bit of user preference. Ideally the frequency response of one driver should roll off as the other one rolls on, but that's extremely simplified and is only a 'good place to start'. You might prefer that the larger driver can take more of the midrange to give it a bit 'more', or you might want the tweeter to only deal with the very highest frequencies.


thanks mate, i dont have a clue what you just said though, so basically just play with crossover an leave the phase switch?
andybriggs0303/09/2020 16:26

thanks mate, i dont have a clue what you just said though, so basically …thanks mate, i dont have a clue what you just said though, so basically just play with crossover an leave the phase switch?


If you've wired it all up the right way round the phase switch should be redundant. I'd start with the crossover in the 'middle' positions and see how it sounds first. And only make tiny changes.

I'm going to guess this is a car setup?
andybriggs0303/09/2020 16:04

also thats not a copy and paste thing??? i want user knowledge mate


That was not a copy and paste thing! I used to run a sound quality completion quality system! All leather trimmed with a custom mounted eq in one quarter panel and crossover in the other side.

Some people used to run the passenger side mid range speaker out of phase as sometimes it sounded better and brought the soundstage further forward.
Edited by: "Wadda" 3rd Sep
What are you connecting the sub to? How low do the speakers go? Do you have any way of changing what frequencies the speakers produce?
Crossover blocks certain frequencies from the output, so if you have a subwoofer, you dont want it to deal with high frequencies, that is not what it is made for. Only you can tell what sounds best, a subwoofer would prefereably see below 120Hz.

All speaker systems need to work together in order to sound good, by flicking the phase switch you are adding a small delay to the sub, for example, if the sub was in front of another speaker, there is no point them both firing into each other, so you would put one out of phase so they work together, same for the car, if you have a sub in the boot, standard phase should be fine, if you have it under the seat, I am sure the one I used to have needed to be out of phase, but again it is all about personal preference. One will usually sound better than the other.
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