What is "acceptable" non-fibre Broadband speed?

17
Found 10th Nov 2017Edited by:"CBK"
Hi all, I have been with a big name provider for good 6 months and consistently get around 7-8meg download speed, and around 0.90mb up. It is not fibre, they just installed an OpenReach Mastersocket 5c. If a movie is streaming at non-HD res then no one can use their mobile for things like Twitter videos or even pictures. Is there anything I can do to ask them to improve it? I do not want to pay the extra/new contract for fibre really as possibly will go with another after the contract runs out.

Thanks!
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Talk talk here 16mb as they don’t have fibre Been it’s them for 3 years nearly 4 but few days ago BT openreach was around my estate installing fibre happy times been waiting forever will be upgrading
Oh and btw there’s nothing you can do to make it better as there hogging the bandwidth of the 8-9mb a second which is 900kbps download in real world terms which isn’t that fast so best to keep them off the internet if you’re watching high def streams
You can check what speed your loaction should be able to get here ..... productsandservices.bt.com/pro…er/


I'm fortunate to have the speed of Virgin (but not the service of cost!) but if I was to go with BT or someone using their network I'd only get speeds similar to you.
Call their support department and talk to them about turning on QOS (Quality Of Service) on your router. QOS is a feature that allows your router to prioritise certain Internet traffic types over others or on some routers even prioritise certain devices over others.

While 8Mbit is not a lot at all for a home with multiple users, a decent broadband router (e.g. Draytek Vigor 2830 2nd hand off Ebay for < £30) should be able to dole out the available bandwidth in a manner that allows everyone to browse websites/check email, while 'one' person is streaming a movie.

Also, if anyone in the house downloads Torrents make sure they limit the number of simultaneous connections to < 200 and apply an apropriate bandwidth limit.
Edited by: "SUMMONER" 10th Nov 2017
I had no fibre speeds for a year or so, as no fibre in area so 5mb which ia fine for most but streaming, and so much hassle, best thing I did was pay 5 more and go with virgin
6-8mb should be enough for that your after, but it depends on the content and apps your using for streaming.

Amazon is terrible compared to say Netflix.
Facebook does a lot stuff in the background which messes with streaming.

QoS will help a bit, but if your using lots of high resources apps/sites and badly optimised streaming services/apps then you'll struggle.
Count your self lucky your getting 7-8mbps. I used to get around 14-16mbs, until I moved recently and now I am getting anywhere between 2.7-3mbps. The annoying part is if I live a dozen houses down I can have fibre, but as it stands all I can get is standard ADSL, and am not sure if they will upgrade as it so only approx 25 houses in the same situation so I don't think it's worth their while financially.
If you value your internet speed, Virgin is the way to go!
i pay for 100mb and get around 95mbps. Of course this drops at peaks times, generally to around 45-55mbps but even this is fantastic.
Family are with Sky, BT and Talk-Talk but all report the connection is poor.
I'm not sure what the minimum speed for the ADSL2+ technology you're on is but it's definitely far below what you're getting.

Speeds are limited by local infrastructure which isn't the ISP's responsibility so the only thing you can do is switch onto a different infrastructure - i.e. Fibre or Virgin.

7Mbps should be sufficient for multiple SD video streams though, so you may find a different router will handle the demands better, although as joe says it could just be badly behaved websites.
As endless waves says, it depends on the local infrastructure. How far you are from the cabinet, how far the cabinet is from the exchange, the state of the cables and how many subscribers.
I'm on fibre now, but when I was on copper we has terrible speeds. I managed to switch from an over subscribed cabinet in the exchange, to an almost unused one. My speed jumped to more than 20 times what it was before (though my speed was less than 300bps originally). I used to use dial up as it was quicker.
I forget how to do it, but there it's a way to force a change from one cabinet in the exchange to another (I expect someone will tell you on here).
You don't switch your router off at night or when not in use, do you? Do you get any interrupts on the line? Anything other than a continuous connection brings DLM (dynamic line management) into play. This slows the speed down in steps until a steady connection is held.
Ring up your provider and tell them it keeps cutting out (whether it does or not), they will monitor it and reset the line to learning mode. If they find it is cutting out they should investigate and remedy it, if it's not they will assume it's something in the house and give you a list of things to check.
Good luck.
Edited by: "mrty" 10th Nov 2017
The below site will give you about the best information to what is available and what speed you should be getting on your exchange.

SamKnows

The below software is also an aid for reporting tools on your speed throughout the day, what devices using what bandwidth etc etc. Also aids any cases against your current ISP.
NetWorx

The below may also help with the ISP.
32408864-1H8U5.jpgSource link for more reading. Source
Edited by: "cecilmcroberts" 10th Nov 2017
Is that a 5C with a Broadband filter faceplate and separate ADSL wire? - that would be the best possible solution as it eliminates possibly iffy microfilters and ring wire unbalance ... not too impressed as a friend gets about 11Mb (and I've rigged them with a single splitter on a normal master plate)
Justsuperman10th Nov

Oh and btw there’s nothing you can do to make it better as there hogging t …Oh and btw there’s nothing you can do to make it better as there hogging the bandwidth of the 8-9mb a second which is 900kbps download in real world terms which isn’t that fast so best to keep them off the internet if you’re watching high def streams


8-9mbps is 8000-9000kbps
chocci1 h, 39 m ago

8-9mbps is 8000-9000kbps


You only get a 10th of the speed tho so 16mb is only a speed of 1.6mb a sec download
Average 300mbs
Justsuperman1 h, 51 m ago

You only get a 10th of the speed tho so 16mb is only a speed of 1.6mb a …You only get a 10th of the speed tho so 16mb is only a speed of 1.6mb a sec download


You are confusing Megabytes and megabits and kilobytes and kilobits

16mbps (megabits) = 2MBps (Megabytes) = 16000kbps (kilobits) = 2000KBps (kilobytes)

google.co.uk/sea…rp.
Edited by: "chocci" 12th Nov 2017
chocci44 m ago

You are confusing Megabytes and megabits and kilobytes and kilobits 16mbps …You are confusing Megabytes and megabits and kilobytes and kilobits 16mbps (megabits) = 2MBps (Megabytes) = 16000kbps (kilobits) = 2000KBps (kilobytes)https://www.google.co.uk/search?num=100&client=ms-opera-mobile&dcr=0&ei=gR8IWoOkDueH0wK6la6gBA&sjs=3&q=megabit+to+kilobit&oq=megabits+to+kilobytes&gs_l=mobile-gws-serp.1.1.0i71l5.0.0..30512.......0.0.............mobile-gws-wiz-serp.


Ooooo thanks for correcting this
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