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    What petrol do you use?

    I know everyones answer will be the Cheapest!

    But i pulled up to Texaco today and it was 106.9p so decided to drive on to Tesco.

    Found it was 104.9p at Tesco but its also this price at BP so i travelled a mile down the road and get my Petrol from BP.

    Was wondering if anyone had views on the Supermarket petrol and how its not meant to be as good as the likes of Shell, BP, Texaco etc.

    Or does anyone only fill up with the better brand petrols and why?

    18 Comments

    I use whoever is the cheapest - I use Diesel - currently the Shell garages in my area are the cheapest - 103.9.

    I don't really subscribe to the theory that Supermarket petrol is inferior, as I haven't seen info from a credible source to suggest this.

    As the company pays for my fuel, it would be daft not to put Shell V-Power in.

    Original Poster

    DKLS;6675246

    As the company pays for my fuel, it would be daft not to put Shell … As the company pays for my fuel, it would be daft not to put Shell V-Power in.



    Haha you lucky thing. Taking advantage, don't blame you.

    I generally use shell unleaded purely because the garage is generally on the route that im going.....If I thought the 'better' unleaded would benifit my car then I would pay the extra bit to use that...but all mechanics tell me it wont make a difference unless you're driving some kinda supercar.....

    stevey_p7;6675260

    Haha you lucky thing. Taking advantage, don't blame you.



    There's not many perks in my job, so will take them where I can.

    Always use Tesco unleaded - Never had any problems

    Is it petrolprices.co.uk


    Its about 101.9 at the mo....

    Though if you spend fifty quid at tesco you get the 5p off a litre and they lowered their rate anyway xx

    I try to use Tesco's diesel to get clubcard points (My company also pays for my fuel).
    I think the mitsubishi garage I use, uses supermarket fuel as an excuse for niggling problems. I asked them for an e-mail they claimed Mitsubishi sent them to corroborate ther comments. I didn't recieve anything so I don't believe them.
    Also, all fuel is made to British Standards, so as long as it is stated on the pumps, I trust it is suitable otherwise Trading Standards would crucify the filling station.

    I use the Shell V Power as my car seems to like it. Although if I was low on petrol and had to use a supermarket, then I wouldn't worry too much as I've not found any major difference. I get slightly less miles from supermarket fuel than the V Power, but only about 30-40 miles less.

    ClarityofMind;6675408

    Is it petrolprices.co.ukIts about 101.9 at the mo....Though if you spend … Is it petrolprices.co.ukIts about 101.9 at the mo....Though if you spend fifty quid at tesco you get the 5p off a litre and they lowered their rate anyway xx



    [url]www.petrolprices.com[/url] but you need to sign up to get the update of the cheapest places and not just the prices lol, lucky, our cheapest is about 106.9 :-( saw it at 109.9 last night :-(

    danny09;6675492

    [url]www.petrolprices.com[/url] but you need to sign up to get the … [url]www.petrolprices.com[/url] but you need to sign up to get the update of the cheapest places and not just the prices lol, lucky, our cheapest is about 106.9 :-( saw it at 109.9 last night :-(



    Strange how London is cheaper?

    You live in a posh place

    Yeah I signed up, get updates every few days.

    106.9 at Tesco here

    I always use the dearer premium fuel in whatever petrol station I use "High octane" give my car the best and hopefully it will give me the best performance back :thumbsup:

    Never look at the price if I need it I need it !

    ClarityofMind;6675501

    Strange how London is cheaper? You live in a posh place :)Yeah I signed … Strange how London is cheaper? You live in a posh place :)Yeah I signed up, get updates every few days.



    LOL!!!!!!! posh! where i live HA hun you make me laugh lol x

    Banned

    wont tell you who I work for but we add water to it to make it go further

    Original Poster

    toshapetriji;6675643

    wont tell you who I work for but we add water to it to make it go further



    Water! Madness. That like paying for ice when i'm buying a drink.

    Name and shame lol.

    stevey_p7;6675669

    Water! Madness. That like paying for ice when i'm buying a drink.Name and … Water! Madness. That like paying for ice when i'm buying a drink.Name and shame lol.



    lmao !!! not quite the same but i know where your coming from :thumbsup: lol

    Pinched from the petrolprices site

    "quote"

    Types of Fuel and Octane Ratings
    Petrol's octane rating is a measurement of the fuel's ability to resist engine knocking. Knock occurs when the fuel-air mix in the cylinder explodes instead of burning in a controlled way. This shockwave moves within the combustion chamber, and creates a metallic 'pinging' sound.

    An octane rating is often referred to as an 'anti-knock index'. If fuel has a high octane number, it will have a higher resistance to engine knocking.

    Octane Numbers
    Usually, there are three different octane numbers associated with all petrols. Petrol's Research Octane Number (RON) is measured under simple test conditions. Petrol's Motor Octane Number (MON) is measured under tougher test conditions and at higher engine speed and temperature.

    The average of these two values is what becomes related closer to actual driving conditions. This value is known as the Road Octane Number, and is what should be used in filling stations.

    Occasionally, some filling stations will confuse these different octane numbers in a bid to embellish on their octane rating claims, and advertise their fuel's Research Octane Number, which is higher than the Road Octane Number. In many European countries, the Research Octane Number is advertised on pumps, so a much higher octane value is common when travelling in certain countries.


    Diesel automatically ignites and burns when it is compressed to a very high pressure. The released energy is contained by the engine and powers the vehicle. The key difference between diesel and petrol engines is auto-ignition. A spark plug ignites the fuel in a petrol engine whereas a diesel engine auto-ignites. Diesel has a Cetane Index and Number rather than the Research Octane Number (RON) that petrol has.

    Diesel drivers may find this diesel drivers forum useful for useful information, advice and discussions.

    Diesel used to be the cheaper option for motorists, but recently the cost of diesel has risen above petrol. This article discusses why diesel costs more than petrol (even though it is easier to make).

    Bio-diesel is a more environmentally friendly fuel slowly becoming available across the UK. It is produced from renewable energy sources such as sugar beet, rape seed and sunflowers and is a biological substitute for regular diesel. Bio-diesel fueled vehicles are more environmentally friendly than conventional cars which run on petrol and diesel because the fuel is not as toxic and does not produce as many damaging exhaust emissions. Read our biodiesel page for more information on this type of fuel or to add your company to our directory if you are a biodeisel supplier.
    Leaded Four Star petrol was removed from sale on British forecourts on 1st January 2000. However, Leaded Four Star is now sold in a small amount of licensed stations in the UK.


    In the UK, the most common petrol types are:

    Ordinary unleaded - 95 RON
    Super unleaded - 98 RON
    Leaded Four Star - 98 RON

    Super Fuels

    Many of the large petrol companies have launched 'super fuels' - petrols and diesels that have a higher research octane level. These fuels are said to increase power in many vehicles, deliver less pollution than regular fuels and help to maintain a cleaner engine. Amongst these 'super fuels' are Tesco's Super Unleaded 99 Octane petrol, supplied by Greenergy, now sold at many stations across the UK and also BP's Ultimate 102 Unleaded which is currently the most advanced, high-performance petrol you can buy on UK forecourts.

    Using Super Fuels

    One of our users commented that using higher octane fuel than your engine requires actually gives no benefit and may be a waste of money. This is because virtually NO engines require 98 RON over 95, and the market for 'super' fuels seems to be based on people's misunderstanding of octane ratings and the placebo effect of filling up with 'more powerful' fuel - making motorists think their engine is running better in some way.

    What do the fuel companies say then, to justify the "increased power" claims for the super grade fuels? Some companies say that while all fuels contain cleaning additives, 'super' fuels contain more or better detergents to keep the injectors cleaner than standard fuel. Others say the fuel is a few percent denser which gives slightly more power per litre. These benefits may be marginal though in comparison to the extra cost involved so it is worth ensuring that your engine will actually benefit before filling up.

    Some engines actually do need higher octane fuel, such as race engines with very high compression and some turbocharged engines, such as the import version of the Nissan Skyline. Also, a few vehicles, such as the new BMW K1200R motorbike, can sense knock and adjust their engine tuning to take advantage of higher grade fuels. Another user commented that the 2004 BMW 330 also does this, according to the driver's handbook it makes 231 BHP on 98 octane and 221 BHP on 95. This ability is apparently widespread amongst German performance cars using Bosch / Siemens electronic engine controls

    "unquote"
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