White vinegar or non-brewed condiment?

6
Found 10th Sep 2015
Basically what is the difference?

I'm in the process of wanting to buy white vinegar (or something similar) mainly for use for body/feet cleaning and also for other home uses such as clearing drain blockages, wiping sinks, windows, etc. Not looking to use it for food at all.

I am confused as to which to buy as I've come across a few deals for non-brewed condiment that are in large quantities (5 litres, which cannot be found in local superstores). I wanted to know if this will be ok for what I want it for? Or do I need to buy the brewed kind of white vinegar?

I already have my 70% isopropyl alcohol and baking soda at the ready, but just need the right vinegar to complete my home-remedy cleaning package. Not looking for that brown, malted vinegar stuff. Just the basic stuff to do what I want it to.

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6 Comments

Original Poster

This is the one I seen. Title says white vinegar, but on the label it states non-brewed condiment. Read somewhere it had to do with some food regulations thing and cannot be sold in local stores, etc...

I think vinegar is made in a similar way to alcohol, and even though the end result is alcohol free people who can't / won't have alcohol in their diet will not consume it. Non-brewed condiment is non-alcoholic because, as the name suggests, it's not brewed. I think its just flavoured acetic acid.

I'm sure that the one you have seen is breaking some rules somewhere because I don't think nbc is "officially" allowed to be called vinegar.

spiderbifida

I think vinegar is made in a similar way to alcohol, and even though the … I think vinegar is made in a similar way to alcohol, and even though the end result is alcohol free people who can't / won't have alcohol in their diet will not consume it. Non-brewed condiment is non-alcoholic because, as the name suggests, it's not brewed. I think its just flavoured acetic acid.I'm sure that the one you have seen is breaking some rules somewhere because I don't think nbc is "officially" allowed to be called vinegar.




Spot on non brewed is just flavored acetic acid and will not have the same properties as the brewed version.

Original Poster

So is it best getting the normal white vinegar from my local or will this condiment stuff will work just the same?

Original Poster

*Bump

The acetic acid - or to give it the modern system name, ethanoic acid, is the vital component for cleaning and non food uses.

True vinegar is fermented and get some flavour elements from it's source.
Non-brewed is artificially flavoured synthetic - they aren't allowed to call it vinegar.

It's like the difference between "sea salt" and other salt
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