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    Why would this happen?

    We had a 3hr power cut this morning and the only way to get a brew was heating the water on the hob. I made the coffee and it tasted completely different from kettle boiled water. It wasn't a metallic taste which I could have attributed to the aluminium saucepan, just a strange different taste. And, no the milk wasn't off!

    22 Comments

    No limescale in the pan...plenty in the kettle?

    maybe the lack limescale from the kettle?

    Had you cooked anything strongly flavoured in the pan before?

    your son cleaned his socks...........where??

    Original Poster

    landofdan;7242804

    maybe the lack limescale from the kettle?


    But wouldn't that make it taste better? This tasted worse.

    Original Poster

    queenlush;7242809

    Had you cooked anything strongly flavoured in the pan before?


    I think OH did something which included wing of bat and leg frog! No, boiled some carrots last.

    I think it may have something to do with the slow uncovered boiling of the water, I always find water boiled in a saucepan makes tea taste fuzzy.

    u didnt put the coffe and the milk in the saucepan did u

    maybe the water was not as hot as it would be in the kettle and so not giving the ultimate brew

    When you boil water you lose oxygen - at a guess I'd say the greater surface area would have meant you'd lost more oxygen than when boiling in a kettle..............

    Original Poster

    Marty1981;7242994

    maybe the water was not as hot as it would be in the kettle and so not … maybe the water was not as hot as it would be in the kettle and so not giving the ultimate brew


    The difference in sea level between the hob and the worktop I doubt is enough to alter the boiling point of water!! I was also making coffee not tea, so water shouldn't be at boiling point anyway. I add milk to the instant coffee before the water so the temp is lower.

    i find it always tastes different boiled in a pan,dont know why but its rank!

    Because the electricity has been off for a while the power in the wires would have emptied, causing the hob to malfunction. Leave it a couple of hours and try again, the wires should fill back up to full capacity and your appliances will work as normal!

    Original Poster

    Goonieman;7243136

    Because the electricity has been off for a while the power in the wires … Because the electricity has been off for a while the power in the wires would have emptied, causing the hob to malfunction. Leave it a couple of hours and try again, the wires should fill back up to full capacity and your appliances will work as normal!


    What have you been smoking??

    kingy58;7243088

    The difference in sea level between the hob and the worktop I doubt is … The difference in sea level between the hob and the worktop I doubt is enough to alter the boiling point of water!! I was also making coffee not tea, so water shouldn't be at boiling point anyway. I add milk to the instant coffee before the water so the temp is lower.


    Nice to know you have a new pan that switches off like a kettle at the right temp? Or did you have the thermometer in till it hit 100? Well that ruled out perhaps you just make bad coffee and just realised it?

    Marty1981;7243944

    Nice to know you have a new pan that switches off like a kettle at the … Nice to know you have a new pan that switches off like a kettle at the right temp? Or did you have the thermometer in till it hit 100? Well that ruled out perhaps you just make bad coffee and just realised it?



    It would still be at 100 degrees when it boiled, no difference whether it boils in the kettle or in a saucepan.

    Babbabooey;7243996

    It would still be at 100 degrees when it boiled, no difference whether it … It would still be at 100 degrees when it boiled, no difference whether it boils in the kettle or in a saucepan.



    and how would you determine it had boiled? Steam? Bubbles ? As it is quite easy confused with evaporation. But i wont bore with simple chemistry

    Marty1981;7244066

    and how would you determine it had boiled? Steam? Bubbles ? As it is … and how would you determine it had boiled? Steam? Bubbles ? As it is quite easy confused with evaporation. But i wont bore with simple chemistry



    Yup, bubbles breaking the surface = boiling water.
    Hardly rocket science.

    Babbabooey;7244107

    Yup, bubbles breaking the surface = boiling water.Hardly rocket science.



    So, (and jsut to stir discussion ), what is 'simmering' water? When simmering you still have bubbles breaking the surface, but when cooking it is a lot different to simmer than it is to boil...

    Babbabooey;7244107

    Yup, bubbles breaking the surface = boiling water.Hardly rocket science.



    i would imagine that the boiling point of your water is 69degrees as most likely a vacuum as your brain must need all the oxygen for basic function

    Original Poster

    Funder;7244200

    So, (and jsut to stir discussion ), what is 'simmering' water? When … So, (and jsut to stir discussion ), what is 'simmering' water? When simmering you still have bubbles breaking the surface, but when cooking it is a lot different to simmer than it is to boil...


    Simmering is a cooking technique in which foods are cooked in hot liquids kept at or just barely below the boiling point of water (at average sea level air pressure), 100°C (212°F) and higher than poaching. To keep a pot simmering, one brings it to a boil and then adjusts the heat downward until just before the formation of steam bubbles stops completely. Water normally begins to simmer at about 94°C (200°F).
    Boiling:The open-air boiling point of water is typically considered to be 100 °C or 212 °F. Pressure and a change in composition of the liquid may alter the boiling point of the liquid. For this reason, high elevation cooking generally takes longer since boiling point is a function of atmospheric pressure.
    I think for simplicity I'll definitely use the kettle tomorrow!

    Marty1981;7247142

    i would imagine that the boiling point of your water is 69degrees as most … i would imagine that the boiling point of your water is 69degrees as most likely a vacuum as your brain must need all the oxygen for basic function



    I guess every website must be wrong then, as they all say that when the bubbles break the surface then the water is boiling. And if you think water boils at 69 degrees then you are even more stupid than I originally thought.:roll:
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