Windows 7 to Windows 10

10
Posted 4th Dec
As Microsoft is no longer supporting Windows 7 after December 31, I left with no alternative but to get Windows 10. I have two questions and wonder if any IT person might be able to help me. I have purchased a new ssd drive and will install windows 10 on that. Is it possible to partition the drive into two and have windows 10 on C drive and my programmes / data on D drive? Just in case they decide to upgrade windows again, I can just upgrade that drive? Secondly, is there a way to clone everything from my old drive on to the new D drive and then delete windows 7 from it?
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Partitioning is only really necessary if you plan to have different operating systems on your PC/laptop (e.g. Windows & Linux). In the past you could gain better performance by partitioning large drives but there's no need to do this any more, and certainly not for SSD.
If you're worried about future upgrades affecting/overwriting/corrupting your data then stop worrying - upgrades won't touch anything other than system files.
It's possible to clone a drive. From what you are saying I would suggest cloning the drive THEN doing the windows upgrade. Cloning is not the same as copying - if you clone a disk it will end up exactly like the old one. So if you stick Windows 10 on your SSD then clone your old disk you'll overwrite the Windows 10 operating system files with Windows 7 files and end up with a messed-up drive.
As to how to clone a drive, there's good software available, but I'm guessing that you don't have a lot of IT knowledge so I would suggest (I mean this in a nice way) getting someone who knows what they're doing, such as a local repair shop.
A jumble of Qs but I think I see where you're going. Separate OS and data partitions can be a sensible move, if a little belt and braces, but can be complicated if a program relying on user data chooses to store such data to a user profile within the OS partition (classic example: MS Outlook). Some progs allow movement of user data, some do not.
Suggested methodology without too much ramble below. If following the suggested route you should not need to purchase a w10 licence, although there's no obligation to buy a w10 lic anyway unless you want to change desktop image to that of your favourite cute cat pic.
Clone the w7 installation to SSD (ideally keeping an image of the w7 installation and / or data backup on some other stroarge).
Upgrade the w7 on SSD to w10 and connect to internet to clarify successful w10 activation.
Wipe & clean install w10.
Reinstate progs / apps.
Optionally partition for OS & data, or just reinstate data from backup.
Optionally bin the now unrequired w7 clone / backup.
Free software to clone any installation is available as Macrium Reflect macrium.com/ref…ree being careful which version to select (version of Home = free), and possibly best subsequently achieved via the USB boot disk version. Can also use commercial Acronis True Image 2020 bootdisk that is available as a zero-cost 670MB boot ISO download direct from Acronis, random example dl.acronis.com/s/A…iso , possibly burning either ISO to USB via Rufus rufus.ie/
I would update to windows 10 now and then copy use the clone software as posted above.

Don't pay for windows 10 as you can still upgrade for free.

techspot.com/dow…tml
Edited by: "markvirgo" 4th Dec
Yup, Windows 7 licences are still valid for Windows 10 installs so you can just use your current key and download the Windows 10 installer from the Microsoft website.

You're just setting yourself up for future problems by trying to use apps that haven't been installed properly. The majority will work, but those that don't can throw errors that aren't obvious.

Your data is should be backed-up so wiping that for a new OS install isn't a big deal.

It's highly unlikely Windows 10 will go out of support before a computer that originally came with Windows 7 fails or becomes inadequate so I can't see any reason for using partitions these days.
A question if I may, as I'm also going from Windows 7 (old laptop) to Windows 10 Pro (new laptop.) I have one or two programs that I would rather not add the activation serial number, is there away around it? I imagine some reading this thread might have a similar problem, not the OP obviously. Thank you in advance
catch2204/12/2019 21:21

A question if I may, as I'm also going from Windows 7 (old laptop) to …A question if I may, as I'm also going from Windows 7 (old laptop) to Windows 10 Pro (new laptop.) I have one or two programs that I would rather not add the activation serial number, is there away around it? I imagine some reading this thread might have a similar problem, not the OP obviously. Thank you in advance


Probably two stages for that requirement:
1) updating existing w7 on old laptop to w10 on old laptop, then
2) cloning the old laptop's w10 installation to a new machine with dissimlar hardware.
In your case an in-situ upgrade from w7 to w10 on your old laptop would not normally require any existing progs to have (any) activations re-activated; likewise when cloned to new but dissimilar hardware.
At least two caveats to that procedure:
a) you may need to source drivers for the new hardware (just source the network drivers and windows should sort the rest), and
b) depending on the version of w7 you may / may not be able to ultimately obtain the Pro version of w10 you imply is on new laptop.

The previously referenced Acronis boot ISO s/w should be able to handle cloning to dissimilar hardware, although MS may (not necessarily will) be fussy about the OS from the old laptop being activated on the new laptop's hardware.

Could always check all the above prior to commitment. Use the same Acronis s/w to image/backup both the existing w7 installation on old laptop and the existing w10 installation on new laptop to external storage, then perform 1 & 2, with option to revert both laptops to original OSs if necessary, although that would still expose the w7 OS to imminent compromised support.
catch2204/12/2019 21:21

A question if I may, as I'm also going from Windows 7 (old laptop) to …A question if I may, as I'm also going from Windows 7 (old laptop) to Windows 10 Pro (new laptop.) I have one or two programs that I would rather not add the activation serial number, is there away around it? I imagine some reading this thread might have a similar problem, not the OP obviously. Thank you in advance



Programs you have are not added to any windows 10 licence so I am not sure what you need?. If you mean copies of office etc that you don't have a licence for then don't worry they will still work.
A couple of things that may stop the update to windows 10 is to make sure you are up to date windows and apps, run a windows trouble shooter to see if you have any issues and if you get a black screen on update reboot you may need to plug into external monitor to setup screen size.
cis_groupie04/12/2019 15:23

Partitioning is only really necessary if you plan to have different …Partitioning is only really necessary if you plan to have different operating systems on your PC/laptop (e.g. Windows & Linux). In the past you could gain better performance by partitioning large drives but there's no need to do this any more, and certainly not for SSD.If you're worried about future upgrades affecting/overwriting/corrupting your data then stop worrying - upgrades won't touch anything other than system files.It's possible to clone a drive. From what you are saying I would suggest cloning the drive THEN doing the windows upgrade. Cloning is not the same as copying - if you clone a disk it will end up exactly like the old one. So if you stick Windows 10 on your SSD then clone your old disk you'll overwrite the Windows 10 operating system files with Windows 7 files and end up with a messed-up drive. As to how to clone a drive, there's good software available, but I'm guessing that you don't have a lot of IT knowledge so I would suggest (I mean this in a nice way) getting someone who knows what they're doing, such as a local repair shop.


Thanks for the info. I don't have an issue cloning the drive as this is rather straightforward with the right software. My reason for partitioning the drive is so that should there be say an upgrade to windows 11 for example, i only the partition on which the os would be affected.
uk3g04/12/2019 23:03

Thanks for the info. I don't have an issue cloning the drive as this is …Thanks for the info. I don't have an issue cloning the drive as this is rather straightforward with the right software. My reason for partitioning the drive is so that should there be say an upgrade to windows 11 for example, i only the partition on which the os would be affected.


There's no harm in partitioning the drive for the O/S. But make sure that you size the partition with some thought - allow for future growth (assume that future flavours of Windows will take up more disk space), as it's not always straightforward when trying to extend a Windows partition that contains an O/S.
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