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    Windows OEM license on repair machines

    Hello,

    Tried having a look around and get a few answers about this but I thought I'd ask the community.

    OEM licenses often cheaper than full retail
    Licenses state you can't use them to upgrade to a new version of windows, windows actively blocks this. However you can generally nuke a hard drive and install fresh and it works. Something I found Online pulled from license agreement (paraphrasing).

    Question I've got is say you were audited, small business big business by Microsoft and you've used OEM Licenses on different types of machines which are considered to be breaching license terms?

    1. Complete custom build
    2. Prebuilt with parts changed
    3. Prebuilt with parts changed due to repairs.
    4. Prebuilts where a devices primary storage has been nuked and then upgraded?

    Prebuilting being a machine such as a Lenovo laptop or a dell desktop.

    Reason I ask is I've repaired a few machines at work and luckily had original
    Keys but had to buy a few retails before from a supported reseller and I've seen how cheap OEM keys are so thinking about using them as there about 1/6th of the price.

    4 Comments

    AFAIK, there was a change with the licensing wording post W8. I also thought one of the good things the EU has done is stop MS gouging everyone and their wife for high priced L's. Not your answer but I think your question needs more clarity.

    If you want to be a golden boy and have a halo - give microsoft a blank cheque with your name on it and they give you a retail copy.
    If you want to save money and Microsoft be none the wiser (and they should still be grateful they have at least got a sale instead of a pirate copy), buy an OEM license and enjoy the same abilities as a retail copy.
    If you want to save even more money and Microsoft are still none the wiser - buy a code off ebay.
    If you want to spend no money at all (and dont feel guilty about microsoft losing out on a few pounds on top of their billions in their banks and you arent concerned about the negligible risk of copyright infringement) then torrent it and get it FOC.

    Many options, and it all boils down to your own personal morals on what payment a mega corporation should receive of your hard earned cash

    JLA92

    Keys but had to buy a few retails before from a supported reseller and … Keys but had to buy a few retails before from a supported reseller and I've seen how cheap OEM keys are so thinking about using them as there about 1/6th of the price.



    I take it you're talking about softwaregeeks and other key sellers? I'm not aware of any normal shop offering OEM versions significantly cheaper?

    I believe the rationale they use is an EU decision that software can be sold second hand. Hopefully one of the few good things that'll come out of brexit will be the reversal of that, even if we're still going to be affected by all of the side effects (app stores etc.)

    As to the questions it depends on which version of windows you're talking about but generally #1 should be a retail licence and #3 and #4 are fine within the scope of the OEM licence.

    #2 would depend on what you were changing. If it was just the original case kept then yeah, that's a new system. I wouldn't worry about changing things like drives and expansion cards, or adding more memory though.

    I agree with EndlessWaves. It really depends on what version of Windows you are running and whether you have any site licensing.
    With regards to repairs from companies such as HP and Dell, they will normally provide a replacement OEM key if they do any work which requires a change.
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