Wired DIY Networking Advice

15
Found 9th Feb
Hi Guys

Wonder if you can help and give some advise.

Homeplugs are not an option in the house for wired connection in all rooms,
Wifi is poor and does not fully reach all bedrooms.

I have run standard cat 5e able in to each room and still have to put either r45 jack on and to a faceplate box.

But what i want to know is if it would be better to have from the main section

internet from router to a double face plated box either with keystone jacks m/f/f/m and then to the faceplate in each room.

or do i just rj45 the wires for each box direclty to the internet router?

Straight threw or corssover wiring?
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Depends on how many ports your router has, if you plan on adding any extra cables and if your only planning on using the local network for the internet connection.
If it's purely for the internet and you have 3 cables with the router having 6 ports free in total then I'd just connect straight into the router.

If your low on ports, using the local network to stream content from one device to another, have wired networked printers or planning on adding more wired devices then put in a 1gb switch.
That way if the router dies you can still stream the local content and use the printers.

EDIT: Wire them up standard and not cross over
Edited by: "joedastudd" 9th Feb
One thing to bear in mind is that twisted pair structured data cable is supposed to be installed as a Balanced Cable Run, there are Balum Circuits (Balance to Unbalanced) buit into the Faceplate Sockets and Patch Panels, so running a length of Cat 5 with just RJ jacks each end is effectively an Unbalanced Run, or at least your relying on the Equipment either end to balance it and how long the Cable run is.

Another thing to take into account is Cat 5 cable is Solid Core, ie, its meant to be Sructured in position, so with a lose end and a RJ Jack on it, it could move around, twist up and or kink, hence why the shorter Patch Leads are a Stranded Core for more flexability.
I'd go with faceplates in each room, wired back to a wall-mounted patch panel next to your router like this:

amazon.co.uk/dp/…4AS

33230019-it2pN.jpg

Then you just use some small patch cables to connect up the ports to your router/switch.
It have all the cable run in trunking along the skirting boards.and to the back box for the faceplates
I don't have much room left on my main router but I have a cat 5 to a small dlink hub behind mytv and this would be the point that either I used small cables to the faceplate to then go to the bedroom faceplates
Crossover cables are to connect two devices directly together without a switch, you need only patch leads.

I assume your HUB is a switch but if it's not replace it with a switch to take the stress off the network. Pointless using the router for anything but internet as they tend to get overloaded easily with local network traffic. Better to buy a purpose built switch to handle the traffic and just use the router to do WIFI and firewall.
webopedia.com/Did…asp
google it, but for a mix of gigabit and FE i have come across a few problems where the pinouts for the wiring standard weren't done properly, think it's the 586b scheme u will need to use but check that, my memory ain't what it used to be
also watch for proximity to any mains cables/ interference sources if you are using unshielded cables
I think keep it simple, to reduce cost I just crimp a plug onto each end of the cable, no need for back boxes, face plates and patch leads. Everything is behind the desk/TV/sofa etc and works in the same way.
kester761 h, 22 m ago

Crossover cables are to connect two devices directly together without a …Crossover cables are to connect two devices directly together without a switch, you need only patch leads.I assume your HUB is a switch but if it's not replace it with a switch to take the stress off the network. Pointless using the router for anything but internet as they tend to get overloaded easily with local network traffic. Better to buy a purpose built switch to handle the traffic and just use the router to do WIFI and firewall.https://www.webopedia.com/DidYouKnow/Hardware_Software/router_switch_hub.asp



Erm, layer 3, layer 4 my friend.

Bridges/switches/hubs are layer 3 and every packet hits the whole network. Switches/Bridges/Hubs don't stop that.

To segment the network and isolate busy pairs of devices (typically NAS streaming to PC or TV in a home environment) you need a layer 4 device (Router).


Good luck crimping RJ45s. I gave up and bought long leads. CAT5 does 150 meters easily. Every join (faceplate/lead) is a potential problem when you are self crimping) and they can be a ******* to find even with a Fluke or similar
Edited by moderator: "removed swear word" 9th Feb
ccnp22 m ago

Good luck crimping RJ45s. I gave up and bought long leads. CAT5 does 150 …Good luck crimping RJ45s. I gave up and bought long leads. CAT5 does 150 meters easily. Every join (faceplate/lead) is a potential problem when you are self crimping) and they can be a ******* to find even with a Fluke or similar


Just get the 2 part ends.33230791-CzGsb.jpg
Makes it a lot easier to make the ends off and much less that can go wrong.
More pricey at ~10p per end, but so much easier it's unreal.
ccnp3 h, 17 m ago

Erm, layer 3, layer 4 my friend. Bridges/switches/hubs are layer 3 and …Erm, layer 3, layer 4 my friend. Bridges/switches/hubs are layer 3 and every packet hits the whole network. Switches/Bridges/Hubs don't stop that.To segment the network and isolate busy pairs of devices (typically NAS streaming to PC or TV in a home environment) you need a layer 4 device (Router).Good luck crimping RJ45s. I gave up and bought long leads. CAT5 does 150 meters easily. Every join (faceplate/lead) is a potential problem when you are self crimping) and they can be a ******* to find even with a Fluke or similar

Thanks for the heads up.
I'm more commenting on cooking the router when doing a lot of fire transferring. Had a lot of issues with my Cisco e4200 overheating when doing multiple large fire transfers across my network. Little buggers used to run full speed and then just give up and then need a reboot.
Never had issues with crimping with the right tools but depends a lot on cable quality and how you pull it. A lot of cables are less forgiving with their radius and other factors.
I’d have gone for a set of mesh routers. Strong signal without all the faff of wiring!
cmdr_elito16 h, 41 m ago

I’d have gone for a set of mesh routers. Strong signal without all the f …I’d have gone for a set of mesh routers. Strong signal without all the faff of wiring!


There's a big difference between a storng signal and good bandwidth. Even a good Mesh network will never compete on high bandwidth use with a wired network.
Uridium22 m ago

There's a big difference between a storng signal and good bandwidth. Even …There's a big difference between a storng signal and good bandwidth. Even a good Mesh network will never compete on high bandwidth use with a wired network.


No but for 99% of home applications it’s more convenient, is suitable and easy to install.
We have sky as a isp and use there kit
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