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    Would a Hisense be a disappointment

    I really want to get a larger screen and go 4k at the same time.
    I currently have a Sony KDL43W756c, which I find wonderful, I just really want get the best out of the PS4 pro I will be getting in the next month or so.
    Would I feel that a budget hisense (m3300 or m5500) was a downgrade.
    Should try to push the budget and go for the m7000, £200 extra seems a lot especially when the Sony KD55XD8005 is only another £50.
    I am just so conflicted on the best option

    31 Comments

    Hisense are decent sets, I doubt you would be disappointed personally.. read up on the reviews on amazon etc to help you decide. I currently have an LG full HD and I've decided on the 55" inch curved Hisense

    Original Poster

    Been doing very little but reading up on them for the last day of two. Just want to make sure I get the best for my money

    if you want to future proof, ensure you get a 10bit panel

    Original Poster

    10 bit panel is probably out of the question, very rare that they drop to a attainable price.
    I might go for a 'budget' set with the plan to upgrade again in maybe 18 months when the whole HDR standards are a bit simpler to understand

    Love mine !

    Have the 55m3300 and from a TV point of view I'm not that impressed. If you have an AV amp to do the scaling then that does help a lot. Also while I don't have a PS4 pro I would guess sitting right in front of it will help with the colours.

    I don't hate it at all but I don't love it by a long way. It's big for the price. If you have a good feed and sit straight on it's fine. Off center with SD content scaled by the TV it's pretty dire.

    No experience of Hisense but I had a mid range Sony (which I loved) a few years ago which I upgraded to a larger Samsung which I really don't like that much as it is only better than the Sony at displaying still images . I would stick to Sony , but I personally would avoid a low end tv with a lot of tech (4K/3D etc) as there is a good reason why there top models are soooo much more expensive and a high end 1080 tv will probably look better that a 4K budget anyway

    having recently 'downgraded' from a (non 4k) 55" Sony to the 40" M3300 (moved house, big TV didn't fit!). The Hisense is a great TV for the £250 I paid but would not recommend as an upgrade. 4k looks great (40" bit too small to fully appreciate) but I notice a lot of motion blur in darker scenes. Can't comment on PS4 Pro but I've heard poor reviews on HDR

    I've owned the 55m7000 since around Oct, had no issues with it and am more than happy with it. Considered the 3300 for a while as I was reading up on them all for a few weeks before buying but decided to spend the extra.

    I've been reading up on all these Hisense models too, and I would strongly suggest the M7000 for an extra couple of hundred pounds. Its their second top of the range TV, and is absolutely brilliant, I've viewed it a friend's house and I can honestly say that it is really really good value for money.
    I've not seen what it is like for gaming, but my friend said it was pretty good; he noticed a slight improvement in game quality etc. but it wasn't huge. Again tho, I can't really comment on that as I haven't witnessed it myself.
    I myself am reeaallyyy close to buying the 55M7000, but I'm just waiting to see what's revealed at CES 2017 before I take the plunge.
    Hope it helps!

    benjammin316

    if you want to future proof, ensure you get a 10bit panel



    I'm into my tech but never really paid much attention to this 4k carry on. I'm guessing not all 4k TV do 10bit and is that as high as they go? I know I could google this question but rather hear from somebody who knows what it means rather than a load of rubbish posts online

    Toon_army

    I'm into my tech but never really paid much attention to this 4k carry … I'm into my tech but never really paid much attention to this 4k carry on. I'm guessing not all 4k TV do 10bit and is that as high as they go? I know I could google this question but rather hear from somebody who knows what it means rather than a load of rubbish posts online




    The ones out now are either 8bit or 10bit.

    10bit is "true hrd" whereas 8bit isn't. But it will still look good! That's the basics of it.

    I'm upgrading the TV end of this year when 10bit becomes more of a standard, and cheaper!

    benjammin316

    The ones out now are either 8bit or 10bit.10bit is "true hrd" whereas … The ones out now are either 8bit or 10bit.10bit is "true hrd" whereas 8bit isn't. But it will still look good! That's the basics of it. I'm upgrading the TV end of this year when 10bit becomes more of a standard, and cheaper!



    I've got a Ps4 Pro so was thinking of getting a new tele anyways, my 55" is just 1080p still looks great but its old tech now. 65" 4k and I'll be happy.
    I'll make sure it's 10bit

    Toon_army

    I'm into my tech but never really paid much attention to this 4k carry … I'm into my tech but never really paid much attention to this 4k carry on. I'm guessing not all 4k TV do 10bit and is that as high as they go? I know I could google this question but rather hear from somebody who knows what it means rather than a load of rubbish posts online



    10-bit in panel terms is the number of brightness levels of subpixel can generate. The only real effect it has is how well the TV avoids banding across different colour spaces. Going for a 10-bit panel 'for future proofing' is just nonsense (it won't affect a thing) and if you want 'True HDR' then you need to focus on the far bigger differences in HDR implementation like colour gamut, brightness range and local dimming ability.

    It's just people getting confused with 10-bit signals and content. If you're going to watch HDR content (which is typically 10-bit) then you need a TV that can accept 10-bit signals - which is everything with even partial HDR ability and several 'HDR processing' TVs as well.

    This is all about HDR and completely unrelated to 4K.

    EndlessWaves

    10-bit in panel terms is the number of brightness levels of subpixel can … 10-bit in panel terms is the number of brightness levels of subpixel can generate. The only real effect it has is how well the TV avoids banding across different colour spaces. Going for a 10-bit panel 'for future proofing' is just nonsense (it won't affect a thing) and if you want 'True HDR' then you need to focus on the far bigger differences in HDR implementation like colour gamut, brightness range and local dimming ability.It's just people getting confused with 10-bit signals and content. If you're going to watch HDR content (which is typically 10-bit) then you need a TV that can accept 10-bit signals - which is everything with even partial HDR ability and several 'HDR processing' TVs as well.This is all about HDR and completely unrelated to 4K.




    8bit panels are not true hdr though. oO

    So a 10bit one is future proofing

    I would say the picture quality is slightly better on my parents Seiki than my Hisense. The Seiki is similar to my mates Samsung, so go for a Seiki.

    I bought the Hisense 55m7000 last month - I upgraded from a 4 year old LG and the difference is unbelievable. Visit a shop and view the Hisense next to its competitors...I couldn't tell the difference between the m7000 and the Samsung KS7000 - watching telly is like looking out the window!

    Toon_army

    I've got a Ps4 Pro so was thinking of getting a new tele anyways, my 55" … I've got a Ps4 Pro so was thinking of getting a new tele anyways, my 55" is just 1080p still looks great but its old tech now. 65" 4k and I'll be happy.I'll make sure it's 10bit



    There's more to it than just the panel in fact there's little difference between a 8+2 panel and a 10 bit,peak brightness and what form of dimming are just as if not more important things are made easier with UHD Premium certification if a TV set makes the minimum standard it can carry the logo this ensures HDR will be working at a reasonable level.Here's a decent link with more detailed information-cnet.com/uk/…ed/

    benjammin316

    8bit panels are not true hdr though. oOSo a 10bit one is future proofing



    There are no 'True HDR' TVs available at the moment. Even if you pay £3500 for the smallest Sony ZD9 it's capabilities are a long way off the 4000cd/m² peak brightness and rec. 2020 colour space of the HDR10 standard.

    What's on offer right now is different levels of partial HDR support. If you want to future proof then there are two things to look at:

    1. How much HDR display ability does the TV have? Colour space coverage, brightness range and local dimming are the most noticeable differences.

    2. How well does the TV map HDR content onto the abilities it does have? Many TVs this year don't handle higher brightness content very well for example so you lose all your highlight detail if you try and feed it content with 0-4000cd/m² HDR metadata.

    Colour depth in any form is just not a big issue. It only makes a tiny difference in display ability and everything can map a 10-bit colour depth correctly whatever panel it has.

    And as Gazman mentioned, the issue is complicated by different sources counting dithering differently. Some will call an 8-bit panel 10-bit if it the TV has dithering, because it can display 1024 brightness levels of a colour over a larger area by alternating colours between pixels, others insist that a panel is only 10-bit is each individual pixel can manage those 1024 levels.

    All in all, it's not a factor that should be influencing your buying decision.

    M4tt31

    I've owned the 55m7000 since around Oct, had no issues with it and am … I've owned the 55m7000 since around Oct, had no issues with it and am more than happy with it. Considered the 3300 for a while as I was reading up on them all for a few weeks before buying but decided to spend the extra.


    Do you mind me asking what picture settings you have. Had mine since wednesday and really struggling to find a good balance.

    Curlyman83

    I bought the Hisense 55m7000 last month - I upgraded from a 4 year old LG … I bought the Hisense 55m7000 last month - I upgraded from a 4 year old LG and the difference is unbelievable. Visit a shop and view the Hisense next to its competitors...I couldn't tell the difference between the m7000 and the Samsung KS7000 - watching telly is like looking out the window!


    HI do you mind me asking which settings you have on yours? im really struggling to get a decent picture on mine, wondering if i have a dud panel

    I have different settings for different inputs i.e. The settings I have for UHD streaming through Netflix are different to that of SD digital tv -what are you watching exactly?

    M7000 is a great TV and is 8bit+2 dithered to make it 10 it's a steal at 689.

    Original Poster

    Cheers guys, think I am now even more confused. I wish there was somewhere near me I could go to look at them but I live in a tiny fishing village. we get almost everything delivered

    willevans716533

    Cheers guys, think I am now even more confused. I wish there was … Cheers guys, think I am now even more confused. I wish there was somewhere near me I could go to look at them but I live in a tiny fishing village. we get almost everything delivered



    In relation to your initial post about getting the best from the PS4 Pro if you want HDR at a level where you are getting a decent impact the entry point is the Samsung KS7500 or KS7000,The Hisense sets are very good but their HDR ability is limited it's just the same for the Sony you mentioned.

    if you're gonna be gaming, compare input lag, thought I read somewhere some hisense sets were quite high, a couple of years ago I had an LG which made games unplayable took it back and got a Sony which consistently have low input lag

    Original Poster

    ohdaesu

    if you're gonna be gaming, compare input lag, thought I read somewhere … if you're gonna be gaming, compare input lag, thought I read somewhere some hisense sets were quite high, a couple of years ago I had an LG which made games unplayable took it back and got a Sony which consistently have low input lag



    thats why I love my current Sony. thinking I might go for this hotukdeals.com/dea…243
    probably get from Amazon as I have about 300 quid in vouchers

    willevans716533

    thats why I love my current Sony. thinking I might go for this … thats why I love my current Sony. thinking I might go for this http://www.hotukdeals.com/deals/sony-kd49xd8077-4k-smart-tv-579-john-lewis-2590243probably get from Amazon as I have about 300 quid in vouchers



    Input lag times are very good on current Sony's and Samsung's but you do have a problem with the Sony XD80 it has no local dimming whatsoever this means HDR cannot work like so many sets on offer right now HDR has been added as a marketing tool rather than functionality the entry point for a Sony with proper HDR is the XD93 but it's a big jump in price at somewhere around £1200-£1300.

    Hisense 55M7000 £649.99 at Crampton and Moore. John Lewis have just price matched this for me.

    jakeyboy4398

    Hisense 55M7000 £649.99 at Crampton and Moore. John Lewis have just … Hisense 55M7000 £649.99 at Crampton and Moore. John Lewis have just price matched this for me.

    Me too very tempted to take the plunge on this

    Just bought the H65M7000 and installed it yesterday and I thinks it's a great TV, yes AO delivered on a bank holiday and were great, tweaking all the setting for day/night viewing and the screen looks great, I used AVForums settings as a starting point and worked from there to adjust settings out of the box, looks great, build is great packaging no problems, JL refused to price match for me btw.
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