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    Would 'one' have a case to argue in this situation?

    Ok, someone applies for a graduate job in, lets say, September 07. The salary offered is 25k. They get offered a role finally in June/July 08 to start in late November 08. Now sometime since Sept 07 the salary for new applicants goes up to 27k. Some of these 'new applicants' will be starting in late Nov - the same as the original applicant.

    It seems quite unfair that two people, both starting a job on the same date with the same experience, will be getting two different salaries. Is there any 'legal', or other, way to argue the lower salary person to get a 'pay rise'???

    17 Comments

    Not really legally, but if the employee is good at their job they could raise the issue that they are unhappy with the pay disparity and ask for a raise. Or consult their union, if they have one.

    You could check the employment contract but I'd be very surprised if there would be anything in it requiring the employer to offer more in these circumstances.

    You could also try asking them to match the new pay rates. That way, you'd certainly get some idea of how much they want you. :whistling:

    Not legally no, it could be raised particularly if the company are very open in their salary rates for new grads but tbh for the sake of £2K I wouldnt

    Original Poster

    jah128;3371503

    Or consult their union, if they have one.



    How easy is that to do if you haven't actually started working for the company yet though?

    If you haven't started working, you certainly won't be a member of a union yet! Honestly there probably isn't much you can do - you have been offered the job at the salary specified, its up to you whether or not you accept that but it seems a lot to give up because you know other new recruits might be earning more.

    Chances are once you have worked a few months you will be up for a pay review; best consider your options then I reckon.

    Original Poster

    tony_s1;3371551

    You could check the employment contract but I'd be very surprised if … You could check the employment contract but I'd be very surprised if there would be anything in it requiring the employer to offer more in these circumstances.


    What if a contract stating the pay hasn't been signed yet?

    crow99;3371554

    Not legally no, it could be raised particularly if the company are very … Not legally no, it could be raised particularly if the company are very open in their salary rates for new grads but tbh for the sake of £2K I wouldnt


    Thing is 2k could be quite useful in the first month when setting up a new home etc

    does your salary include london weighting? or u could argue inflation haha. the best thing to do is ask VERY politely, it goes a long way.

    Original Poster

    jah128;3371595

    you have been offered the job at the salary specified, its up to you … you have been offered the job at the salary specified, its up to you whether or not you accept that.



    This is what I was thinking, but was wondering. Especially since neither of the people have started yet and have the 'same' background/abilities.

    Original Poster

    kippy;3371631

    does your salary include london weighting? or u could argue inflation … does your salary include london weighting? or u could argue inflation haha. the best thing to do is ask VERY politely, it goes a long way.



    It's not strictly a London job. Although it is inside the M25 in Surrey. So almost! I guess inflation could be used as an excuse, but how seriously would that be taken? It has gone up a lot since last September!

    03bintls;3371617

    What if a contract stating the pay hasn't been signed yet?Thing is 2k … What if a contract stating the pay hasn't been signed yet?Thing is 2k could be quite useful in the first month when setting up a new home etc



    If a new employee raised the issue with me I would state that at the period of application the salary was £25K which you have accepted, if you want the salary of a 'new' recruit then we can start the application process with you again as the job market and situation has changed. Although their is know guarntee you would be succesful in a new round.

    Personally I fully expect jobs to be paid at different rates depending on market avaliabilty, time of recruitment, experience, location etc...

    Sadly for one employee they were recruited when the company was highering at a lesser salary, had they been applying now at the slightly inflated salary who is to say that would get the role?

    I think the best bet would be to start and compelete six months and then judge the situation then if appropriate ask to be have you salary put inline with your peers based on work completed etc..

    03bintls;3371671

    It's not strictly a London job. Although it is inside the M25 in Surrey. … It's not strictly a London job. Although it is inside the M25 in Surrey. So almost! I guess inflation could be used as an excuse, but how seriously would that be taken? It has gone up a lot since last September!



    It wouldn't you knew at the time of acceptance what your start date was and the salary.
    That was the point for any negoitation - any negoitation now would not be taken in a positive light unless you are a exceptional candidate and for most grads this isn't the case, until you have proven experience hence in three-six months time when you have proven your worth you are in a better negoitating position.

    I would certain raise it with the human resource team - they can only say no!

    Pretty clear as far as I'm concerned. Simple offer and acceptance test. If the applicant accepted the offer around July at 25k then they were obviously happy with that and agreed to do the job for the 25k.

    Totally agree with you in terms of it not being far that someone who starts around the same time is then given 27K but unless some fundamental breach of contract of employment law is evident then its entirely legal. Albeit pretty carp.

    did the applicant who accepted around July raise the issue with HR for a review?

    Original Poster

    Ok. So.....there is no official leg to stand on, but it may be worth just raising the situation with HR? That is what I'm getting?

    StevenA2000_uk;3371867

    did the applicant who accepted around July raise the issue with HR for a … did the applicant who accepted around July raise the issue with HR for a review?



    No they didn't, because they've only just realised that the salary is different.

    03bintls;3371946

    Ok. So.....there is no official leg to stand on, but it may be worth just … Ok. So.....there is no official leg to stand on, but it may be worth just raising the situation with HR? That is what I'm getting?No they didn't, because they've only just realised that the salary is different.




    Absolutely! This should be raised to HR, especially if it is the same role, same job description and in the same function. Highlight this to them and them for an explanation for the difference.

    Original Poster

    StevenA2000_uk;3372052

    Absolutely! This should be raised to HR, especially if it is the same … Absolutely! This should be raised to HR, especially if it is the same role, same job description and in the same function. Highlight this to them and them for an explanation for the difference.



    Ok. Good plan. I can't wait to hear what they say!

    Worth checking that the ts&c's are exactly the same before trying though.
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