Would you buy a property if it had electric storage heaters & an immersion tank

22
Found 12th May
I'm a first time buyer, I had no idea what an electric storage heater was until I called a very knowledgeable friend in the building industry - he told me as soon as I uttered the words "electric storage heaters" to walk away from the property.

I've done a bit of research, I know now what they are and would definitely want to get rid before the Winter and replace with either electric radiators or GCH. There's a gas feed but the fire is the only thing that uses it. I'd be worried if GCH was installed that all of the walls would need ripping apart, is that the case?
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GCH can be piped from the ceiling down the surface of the wall to the radiator, or under the floorboards. A conventional boiler could be used to heat the hot water cylinder again running pipes up the wall depending on the layout of the house.
If it looks complicated get a fixed price quote from a couple of plumbers.
Although electricity is horrifically expensive for heating, you'll probably have an economy 7 meter in an electrically heated house.
Electric heating is 100% efficient unlike gas, no local pollution and gas boilers are eyewateringly expensive to buy compared to electric storage heaters.
We had storage heaters for years if you can get comfort plus control there great ! That’s a electricity tariff ! Would not put me off if house is nice and in a good area !
Storage heaters wouldn't put me off buying a property IF it met my criteria, i.e. nice area, nice property at a reasonable price.

Anyone I've ever spoke to about them hating storage heaters don't use them properly, particularly old manual models, these need the controls adjusted on a daily basis.

You'd be looking on the wrong side of £5,000 to install GCH.
My mother purchased a new build in Cornwall 12 years ago and she likes her storage heaters
Never had a problem with them either
I was dubious at the time but they work fine for her
Looking at the cost of changing to GCH, when i purchased my property after 2 years i had to change the GHC for a new model anyway.
Your very knowledgeable friend is, how shall I say this, somewhat 'blinkered' in outlook. Storage heaters is no reason to walk away but it may not be the ideal solution. Look at whether the property is well located, well maintained and ideal for you.

Ask to see the electricity bills for the last 12 months (which was a cold year and saw a 20% increase in my gas CH usage). Ask for KWh as well as cost per month, then shop around for a good tariff and see how much it would cost.

If you can install solar PV, the property may be a bargain to heat.

And as others have said, retrofitting gas CH in the summer is not a difficult job and need not be expensive.
Edited by: "ccnp" 12th May
Yes. Will be cheap to run if small /medium house. I would swap fire and hop if gas for electric and not bother with standing charge ect. You will save money on not having breakdown cover and servicing plus if one heater packs up you won't go cold like with a boiler. My mate spent 4k on swapping his place to central heating. His boiler developed a fault 2 years ago and he's heating with 2 oil filled radiators now at £35 each. Seems crazy to me as I said stick with storage heaters right from the start but he was set on the idea of central heating. Buy the place and enjoy the money you are saving by buying crap you don't need posted here. Lol
Edited by: "wayners" 12th May
Just remember, if the house is all okay in other respects and you like the house/location/price you can always change the heating later on a lot easier than changing house!
As someone else pointed out, I think your friend is not as open minded as they could be!
Edited by: "Dyslexic_Dog" 12th May
Thank you all for your comments, it's crazy how not one of you dislike storage heaters when so many Google searches have taken me to forums with people crying out about how bad they are - of course there's good and bad heaters and I'm sure these things from the 1970s probably aren't as efficient as newer ones (which cost a bomb for a single unit as well).

My friend is a project manager for a global building firm but yes, he was speaking from personal experience of using electric storage heaters and said it was a nightmare to keep his place warm, and that was a two bed flat. He said from his POV, he's never spoken to anyone who was positive about the prospect of having to use electric storage heaters over other methods.

For me, this is a three bed bungalow and I will only really need to heat 60% of the house to its fullest capacity as other rooms will be storage or widely unused. The problem with the eco7 tariff is that I might be working from home 2-3 days a week and I will absolutely rinse my electric if I do that on the higher tariff.

Solar is a good shout, I've always considered it. Also checking bills is a good option but I think the property has been on the market since November last year, missing out the all important cold Winter months.
I'd like to go back to the property and have a professional check it out, just to give me options on keeping it as-is, or ripping it out for electric rads, or changing it all up for a combi and GCH.

Any ideas who would be best placed for this? i.e. Electrician, plumber, gas specialist?
Barter with the asking price in lieu of having to install GCH. GCH is the best and only way to gi
moneybag5 h, 54 m ago

GCH can be piped from the ceiling down the surface of the wall to the …GCH can be piped from the ceiling down the surface of the wall to the radiator, or under the floorboards. A conventional boiler could be used to heat the hot water cylinder again running pipes up the wall depending on the layout of the house.If it looks complicated get a fixed price quote from a couple of plumbers.Although electricity is horrifically expensive for heating, you'll probably have an economy 7 meter in an electrically heated house.Electric heating is 100% efficient unlike gas, no local pollution and gas boilers are eyewateringly expensive to buy compared to electric storage heaters.


Electric per kWh = around 16p
Gas per kWh = around 4-5p

A gas combi boiler and central heating will be cheaper to run. Had our combi boiler installed for £1600 as you would need radiators etc it would probably cost more, boiler will typically last 15 years at which point only the boiler would need replacing.
dkl_uk1 h, 37 m ago

Thank you all for your comments, it's crazy how not one of you dislike …Thank you all for your comments, it's crazy how not one of you dislike storage heaters when so many Google searches have taken me to forums with people crying out about how bad they are - of course there's good and bad heaters and I'm sure these things from the 1970s probably aren't as efficient as newer ones (which cost a bomb for a single unit as well).My friend is a project manager for a global building firm but yes, he was speaking from personal experience of using electric storage heaters and said it was a nightmare to keep his place warm, and that was a two bed flat. He said from his POV, he's never spoken to anyone who was positive about the prospect of having to use electric storage heaters over other methods.For me, this is a three bed bungalow and I will only really need to heat 60% of the house to its fullest capacity as other rooms will be storage or widely unused. The problem with the eco7 tariff is that I might be working from home 2-3 days a week and I will absolutely rinse my electric if I do that on the higher tariff.Solar is a good shout, I've always considered it. Also checking bills is a good option but I think the property has been on the market since November last year, missing out the all important cold Winter months.


I think you've mis-understood folks' comments, no-one has stated they would prefer electric storage heating over any other method, just that storage heaters wouldn't put them off buying a property, or there experiences of storage heating has been fine.

GCH is nearly always the preferred heating source, but in your situation, only you can decide if you could persevere with storage heating, or would be willing to install (£££'s) GCH.

Again, only you can judge if installing a heating system would cause you heartache, are you decorating house from top to bottom, if so installing GCH wouldn't be a bid deal IMO (finances allowing of course), should only involve lifting the floors to install pipes, walls shouldn't be affected, particularly if you were planning on moving in after decorating was finished. If your looking at moving straight in and not decorating, then it would cause disruption, not a big deal really for a bungalow with an existing gas supply, I'd hazard a guess at 4/5 days.
There's a reason only landlords stick storage heaters in...

Either the price reflects lack of gch, or it's a very easy way to negotiate down.

It can be as little as 2.5K to fit. If you want it done properly 4-5K will get you something that works properly, and looks nice. Everything doesn't have to end up with a combi, unvented cylinders are superb.
themorgatron20 m ago

There's a reason only landlords stick storage heaters in...Either the …There's a reason only landlords stick storage heaters in...Either the price reflects lack of gch, or it's a very easy way to negotiate down.It can be as little as 2.5K to fit. If you want it done properly 4-5K will get you something that works properly, and looks nice. Everything doesn't have to end up with a combi, unvented cylinders are superb.



The initial outlay, and the yearly service could/would put off landlords to install GCH also.
My daughter has a two bed flat and only uses the one heater which heats the entire flat nicely as it is centrally placed. The downside is that you have to pre-plan for cold days amongst warm ones - no switching it on for an hour if it's a bit nippy after a warm day. I much prefer my central heating, especially with Hive fitted
andynicol2 h, 17 m ago

The initial outlay, and the yearly service could/would put off landlords …The initial outlay, and the yearly service could/would put off landlords to install GCH also.


My point was, it's only landlords who think they are any good, because every landlords only concern is cost.

If it's your own home, central heating is the only consideration (or logs burners etc if you're a bit more wild).
I wouldn't be put off buying the property if it has already got a mains gas supply, I'd just take into account the cost of installing gas central heating when considering the price of the house. My parents had storage heaters installed when I was a kid, was rarely warm enough in winter, I absolutely hated them.

However, if I was planning on renting it out rather than living in it, then I wouldn't be too bothered.
Edited by: "melted" 12th May
My last two rented flats (over the last 5 years so plenty of time to get used to the heaters) have had storage heaters and the only way I would consider buying a property with them is if I could get the cost of converting to GCH taken off the price. Absolutely hate the storage heaters and it would be a priority for me to rip them out.
I am not aware of any new build properties that install storage heaters, that alone should give you an idea that they are outdated. All the customers I see that have them hate them because by the time it gets to evening the heat has ran out and it they only heat up again over night during economy 7 hours.
Gas central heating and removal of old heaters will be in the region of £6-7000.
They are not ideal but if you love the house it's not the end of the world.
Yep, storage heaters were the "big thing" in the 1970's and 1980's, so these units will be between 30 & 40 years old. You can still buy them but individual costs are in the very high £££ mark so quite literally no point having them.

I'm considering just throwing some decent electric rads in, a flat I rented once had no gas supply and was insulated well enough that the rads didn't even need turning on for two Winters. Get off the eco7 tarriff and the fact I should only need them a few hours a day, four months a year should do the job nicely. Or, there's GCH, which will up the value of the property should I come to sell in 20 years - luckily the gas supply is in but literally nothing but a fireplace uses it (and that's a fairly recent addition, it wasn't built with the house).

The problem I see with GCH is the daily standard charge for gas which I won't be using as the cooker is electric - hell, everything is electric. I'd rather rip the gas out of the property and do full electric. Won't win me any points on the EPC but I'm personally quite conversative with my electric and rarely go over £35/month.

Now I've just to find out if there's electric rads that come with a "Hive" style connectivity so I can control the house while I'm not there. Also I have to think about what to do with the immersion heater, I've been told since I have one that I should keep it as a backup, but to be fair if I'm installing electric rads then I won't be installing a combi boiler anyway, and the bath will be getting ripped out in place of an electric shower so even if there's no hot water, there's a hot shower.
dkl_uk1 h, 13 m ago

Yep, storage heaters were the "big thing" in the 1970's and 1980's, so …Yep, storage heaters were the "big thing" in the 1970's and 1980's, so these units will be between 30 & 40 years old. You can still buy them but individual costs are in the very high £££ mark so quite literally no point having them.I'm considering just throwing some decent electric rads in, a flat I rented once had no gas supply and was insulated well enough that the rads didn't even need turning on for two Winters. Get off the eco7 tarriff and the fact I should only need them a few hours a day, four months a year should do the job nicely. Or, there's GCH, which will up the value of the property should I come to sell in 20 years - luckily the gas supply is in but literally nothing but a fireplace uses it (and that's a fairly recent addition, it wasn't built with the house).The problem I see with GCH is the daily standard charge for gas which I won't be using as the cooker is electric - hell, everything is electric. I'd rather rip the gas out of the property and do full electric. Won't win me any points on the EPC but I'm personally quite conversative with my electric and rarely go over £35/month.Now I've just to find out if there's electric rads that come with a "Hive" style connectivity so I can control the house while I'm not there. Also I have to think about what to do with the immersion heater, I've been told since I have one that I should keep it as a backup, but to be fair if I'm installing electric rads then I won't be installing a combi boiler anyway, and the bath will be getting ripped out in place of an electric shower so even if there's no hot water, there's a hot shower.



You seem decided what way your going, just bear in mind your previous flat will be totally different to heat in comparison to a bungalow..
Edited by: "andynicol" 13th May
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