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    Would you pay to view certain websites?

    Say for example, an auction site was to be like quidco had a yearly membership fee to pay. Would you pay the yearly fee? I can think of a few examples why it would work and why it wouldn't work but would you?

    The main reason i can see in theory as that scammers aren't gonna pay a yearly mambership, then pay the fees to list their auctions as well.

    would you pay ?

    10 Comments

    yes they would :? quidco membership thing is a fiver, so something like 10, 20 quid membership wouldnt put a scammer off imo

    A scammer would pay a few quid because it could be worth thoudands to them. You have got to keep your wits about you on the internet, the one basic rule that is ever so true these days is, if it looks to good to be true then it probably is.

    Scammers aren't scared of a few quid....it's genuine buyers who think they may not use it that much that'll be scared off.

    Someone recently told me that a scammer was sending missed delivery courier attempts and if they want there package delivered, they would require to pay £2.50....this is when they would withdraw £250 from each person (everyone would pay without even knowing about the package, as that's how couriers work) and then placed a full 1 page ad in the paper.

    These ads cost loads of money, so everyone assumed it was legit and they apparantly stole half a mil from everyone and MP went mad because he almost was conned in the process.

    Scammers will spend money to make money....remember that.

    Banned

    realfriendlyman;6423834

    Scammers will spend money to make money....remember that.



    You sorted out that website yet? :w00t:

    realfriendlyman;6423834

    Scammers aren't scared of a few quid....it's genuine buyers who think … Scammers aren't scared of a few quid....it's genuine buyers who think they may not use it that much that'll be scared off.Someone recently told me that a scammer was sending missed delivery courier attempts and if they want there package delivered, they would require to pay £2.50....this is when they would withdraw £250 from each person (everyone would pay without even knowing about the package, as that's how couriers work) and then placed a full 1 page ad in the paper.These ads cost loads of money, so everyone assumed it was legit and they apparantly stole half a mil from everyone and MP went mad because he almost was conned in the process.Scammers will spend money to make money....remember that.



    That was this weeks Watchdog.

    guv;6423933

    You sorted out that website yet? :w00t:



    Which one, the one the American coder stole my money and ran off or my friends one?

    Babbabooey;6423965

    That was this weeks Watchdog.



    Was the details correct, as my friends have a habit of mixing fact and fiction? lol

    realfriendlyman;6424009

    Which one, the one the American coder stole my money and ran off or my … Which one, the one the American coder stole my money and ran off or my friends one?Was the details correct, as my friends have a habit of mixing fact and fiction? lol



    Yep, pretty much. The scam was for £2.20, and it was Alastair Campbell, not an MP...

    BBC Watchdog: Alastair Campbell investigates £1m scam

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In May this year Britain's most famous spin doctor Alastair Campbell came close to falling for a very elaborate scam.

    He received a card through his door from North London-based Parcel Express UK telling him he had a parcel waiting for collection and that he'd have to call them and pay a £2.20 fee on his credit card for it to be re-delivered.

    Rather than pay the fee over the phone he decided to go down to the company's depot in North London, the address of which was on the card. When he arrived he found an industrial estate with a block of rental offices - but no depot for Parcel Express UK. He did however find a man who told him, "Don't tell me, another £2.20 fee - it's a scam".

    After digging further, Alastair discovered that the Parcel Express UK scam is part of a much larger, more sinister, nationwide fraud operation that could be worth up to £1 million.

    "In my days at Downing Street I got used to spotting traps and avoiding problems. But on this occasion, I was nearly taken in by a simple card which dropped through my letter box," he says.

    As part of Alastair's investigation for Watchdog he returned to the site to meet Dominic Perri, the manager of the rental offices. Dominic told him Parcel Express UK had never operated on the site and that earlier this year there had been 50-60 people in the space of two months calling at the offices looking for them.

    Watchdog's discovered hundreds of people from London and the South East of England who have given their bank details to Parcel Express UK after receiving a card through their door. Cards have also been received featuring the company name Network Link Couriers. Some of the card recipients have had thousands of pounds taken from their credit cards.

    £2,400 taken

    Keith Walker was one of them. "There was a withdrawal from my account of £2,415," he says.

    Because it was taken fraudulently, Keith's bank has now refunded his money. He found out that the money taken from his account had been paid to a Scottish newspaper: The Daily Record.

    Alastair couldn't work out why Keith's money had been paid to a newspaper until he met Bethan Featherby from Westminster Trading Standards who explained more about the second part of the scam.

    Using the credit card details they've collected from people like Keith Walker, the people behind Parcel Express UK buy adverts in local and national papers. The adverts look like they are from mail order companies selling gadgets and electrical goods. But these companies don't exist either and customers never receive their goods. The adverts have run in up to 60 papers across the UK.

    Scam funding a scam

    "These large, glossy advertisements were supposedly for mail order goods. Mobile phones, laptops, cameras, you name it. Everybody who ordered the goods, though, unfortunately didn't receive them." Bethan Featherby explained.

    Alastair discovered that Parcel Express UK is a small scam, which is the basis for the much bigger scam, taking money through these mail order adverts. The newspapers are under no obligation to check the identities of advertisers.

    Fran Flint also thinks the newspapers should have done more checks. After seeing one of the adverts in her local newspaper she handed over £45 for a vacuum cleaner - and received nothing.

    "I feel really angry with the newspaper, really angry with the newspaper. I feel that they've let the readers down," she said. "You would assume that they'd have done the checks that were necessary."

    Up to £1m worth of fraud

    City of London Police's DCI Paul Barnard has been investigating this scam for months. "We estimate at the moment, from those victims who've come forward and the crime we know about, we're looking at between half a million to a million pounds worth of fraud," he said.

    "There is an element of sophistication in where they've tried to hide their tracks. And I'm confident that we will be able to uncover that, and make arrests."

    The police are still gathering evidence and are keen to hear from more people who've been stung. The Scottish Daily Record says that when the scammers took out their ads with them they managed to satisfy all the relevant checks. The newspaper says that it is happy to work with Trading Standards and the police to catch those behind the scam

    The Scottish Daily Record told Watchdog:
    We will launch an immediate investigation. If we find that these companies are acting unlawfully then we will genuinely take action against them. We are happy to work with Trading Standards and the police.

    The mail order company who advertised in the paper satisfied all the relevant checks. The paper had no way of knowing that the credit card used to pay for the adverts was in fact stolen.

    Have you ever been a victim of a credit card scam? Let us know what you think. And remember if you have any new stories for us to investigate you can email us directly.

    If you've received a Parcel Express UK or Network Link Courier card or have been a victim of one of the mail order scam, please call Consumer Direct on 08454040506.

    Original Poster

    realfriendlyman;6424009

    Which one, the one the American coder stole my money and ran off or my … Which one, the one the American coder stole my money and ran off or my friends one?



    turn msn on you big cuddly bear ;-)

    faevilangel;6424076

    turn msn on you big cuddly bear ;-)



    That's scary hearing that. :oops:

    Nevertheless....I've switched it on incase you wanna talk about creating websites.

    Original Poster

    realfriendlyman;6424097

    That's scary hearing that. :oops:Nevertheless....I've switched it on … That's scary hearing that. :oops:Nevertheless....I've switched it on incase you wanna talk about creating websites.



    only interested in talking about you :whistling:
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