Save 40% on your MCSA, MCSD, or MCSE certification at Microsoft
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Save 40% on your MCSA, MCSD, or MCSE certification at Microsoft

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Expires on 30/06/2020Posted 23rd Mar
If you have started working towards a MCSA, MCSD, or MCSE certification, now is the time to prepare for your exam. Microsoft recently announced that all remaining certification exams associated with Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA), Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer (MCSD), Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE) will retire on June 30, 2020. Until then, save 40% on featured Exam Refs to prepare to get your certification before the deadline. Use discount code MSCERT at checkout.
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I am in IT and can tell you now I would never not hire someone just because they have this certification. Imagine not hiring someone who wants to learn! If I wanted to hire a carpenter and someone had a GCSE in woodwork I'd probably think they have some sort of understanding of the theory of carpentry and maybe ask more questions about their practical experience of it, rather than dismiss them outright like some sort of demented halfwit.
Going_Digital23/03/2020 21:08

I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, …I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, the people who take them are not people with a natural aptitude for technical disciplines. It is a bit like going for a job as a carpenter and you are asked what experience you have and to show examples of your work and answering I have a GCSE in woodwork.


And I would never work for someone like you so it is win win, get additional qualifications and work for a good boss.
I've got a whole bunch of certifications Microsoft and other vendors. The value in having these when you are job hunting makes gaining certs worthwhile. Yes you will need some experience but these add so much value.
I’m a SQL Developer and found them useful, it forces you to learn new aspects of the products you might never be exposed to ordinarily as well as alternative ways to solve problems.
33 Comments
Appoligies for my lack of understanding, but is it really worth saving money on these if they are about to be retired?
Edited by: "FinbarMcDougal" 23rd Mar
FinbarMcDougal23/03/2020 20:55

Appoligies for my lack of understanding, but is it really worth saving …Appoligies for my lack of understanding, but is it really worth saving money on these if they are about to be retired?


They still count as a certification
I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, the people who take them are not people with a natural aptitude for technical disciplines. It is a bit like going for a job as a carpenter and you are asked what experience you have and to show examples of your work and answering I have a GCSE in woodwork.
I am in IT and can tell you now I would never not hire someone just because they have this certification. Imagine not hiring someone who wants to learn! If I wanted to hire a carpenter and someone had a GCSE in woodwork I'd probably think they have some sort of understanding of the theory of carpentry and maybe ask more questions about their practical experience of it, rather than dismiss them outright like some sort of demented halfwit.
I’m a SQL Developer and found them useful, it forces you to learn new aspects of the products you might never be exposed to ordinarily as well as alternative ways to solve problems.
IT admin here for the past 3 years but with no certs, any recommondations on which one to take? Been meaning to do one for a while and love 40% off
No better time than right now to be learning stuff.
Going_Digital23/03/2020 21:08

I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, …I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, the people who take them are not people with a natural aptitude for technical disciplines. It is a bit like going for a job as a carpenter and you are asked what experience you have and to show examples of your work and answering I have a GCSE in woodwork.


And I would never work for someone like you so it is win win, get additional qualifications and work for a good boss.
I've got a whole bunch of certifications Microsoft and other vendors. The value in having these when you are job hunting makes gaining certs worthwhile. Yes you will need some experience but these add so much value.
Going_Digital23/03/2020 21:08

I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, …I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, the people who take them are not people with a natural aptitude for technical disciplines. It is a bit like going for a job as a carpenter and you are asked what experience you have and to show examples of your work and answering I have a GCSE in woodwork.


Surly it proves their ability to learn and you combine it with practical work experience. Are you saying to never take any certification? Theyre good for learning new skills or proving you know a specific area in detail.
RichArab23/03/2020 21:16

I am in IT and can tell you now I would never not hire someone just …I am in IT and can tell you now I would never not hire someone just because they have this certification. Imagine not hiring someone who wants to learn! If I wanted to hire a carpenter and someone had a GCSE in woodwork I'd probably think they have some sort of understanding of the theory of carpentry and maybe ask more questions about their practical experience of it, rather than dismiss them outright like some sort of demented halfwit.


And the comment before his...

Spot the fake account.
darraghdie23/03/2020 21:27

IT admin here for the past 3 years but with no certs, any recommondations …IT admin here for the past 3 years but with no certs, any recommondations on which one to take? Been meaning to do one for a while and love 40% off


Don't take any. Waste of time in my opinion. But again just my opinion. Btw working in it for 10 years.
sjaddy23/03/2020 22:11

And I would never work for someone like you so it is win win, get …And I would never work for someone like you so it is win win, get additional qualifications and work for a good boss.


Sure bud. Good luck.
Ega_Hacass23/03/2020 22:53

Don't take any. Waste of time in my opinion. But again just my opinion. …Don't take any. Waste of time in my opinion. But again just my opinion. Btw working in it for 10 years.


Working in what for 10 years? If you meant IT then it should be capitalised, guess you would have learned that with an MCSE good luck in your help desk job
Going_Digital23/03/2020 21:08

I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, …I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, the people who take them are not people with a natural aptitude for technical disciplines. It is a bit like going for a job as a carpenter and you are asked what experience you have and to show examples of your work and answering I have a GCSE in woodwork.


I can tell you for nothing you'd hire me. Whether I'd want to work for you is another thing though.
Edited by: "the__cat" 23rd Mar
I used to work in IT and have some certs COMPAQ, HP, MCP, A+, NETWORK+ etc. I can tell you one thing for sure. Book smarts and being good at taking exams is no substitute for real world hands on knowledge and experience. Reading a book and taking an exam does not make you a computer genius. Its a bit like sex, it takes years of actually doing it to become experienced.
Going_Digital23/03/2020 21:08

I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, …I am in IT and can tell you now I would never hire someone with an MCSE, the people who take them are not people with a natural aptitude for technical disciplines. It is a bit like going for a job as a carpenter and you are asked what experience you have and to show examples of your work and answering I have a GCSE in woodwork.


I've been in IT for over 20 years and now a developer and your comment is ignorant.
sjaddy23/03/2020 22:11

And I would never work for someone like you so it is win win, get …And I would never work for someone like you so it is win win, get additional qualifications and work for a good boss.


Haha! Exactly As soon as you start working for ignorant people you're asking for trouble.
Edited by: "muppetrider" 24th Mar
C0mm0d0re_K1d24/03/2020 00:33

I used to work in IT and have some certs COMPAQ, HP, MCP, A+, NETWORK+ …I used to work in IT and have some certs COMPAQ, HP, MCP, A+, NETWORK+ etc. I can tell you one thing for sure. Book smarts and being good at taking exams is no substitute for real world hands on knowledge and experience. Reading a book and taking an exam does not make you a computer genius. Its a bit like sex, it takes years of actually doing it to become experienced.


I agree to some extent, but it's only part of the story. Both are desirable; experience more so than certs. I think the point some of us were trying to make is that we wouldn't not hire someone simply because they actually have a recognised certification. They have to display their experience too, absolutely, and if they do I wouldn't deny them an opportunity just because they were certified. That would be silly.
the__cat24/03/2020 09:35

I agree to some extent, but it's only part of the story. Both are …I agree to some extent, but it's only part of the story. Both are desirable; experience more so than certs. I think the point some of us were trying to make is that we wouldn't not hire someone simply because they actually have a recognised certification. They have to display their experience too, absolutely, and if they do I wouldn't deny them an opportunity just because they were certified. That would be silly.


Well said, essentially what I meant is that these kinds of certifications are of no interest to me as an employer. I wouldn't not employ someone just because they had them, but the point is I completely ignore them. I am not interested in someone's ability to remember enough stuff to pass a test. I am interested in someone with good problem solving skills and an aptitude for technical things.

In my experience, those that hold these certifications are not the same sort of people as those with the ability to understand things. It is fine that you learnt on the course that editing some registry value will do something, but I can find that on google.

It is the same with schools, poor schools teach you facts and figures that you can recite at exam time. Good schools teach you how to think critically for yourself and get to the answer using a logical approach.

So in essence, I should have said these kinds of qualifications are meaningless to me when I am employing IT people.
muppetrider24/03/2020 03:55

I've been in IT for over 20 years and now a developer and your comment is …I've been in IT for over 20 years and now a developer and your comment is ignorant.


There are plenty of useless politicians that have been in their jobs for more than 20 years, so length of tenure is no indication of quality.
darraghdie23/03/2020 21:27

IT admin here for the past 3 years but with no certs, any recommondations …IT admin here for the past 3 years but with no certs, any recommondations on which one to take? Been meaning to do one for a while and love 40% off


None of them, decide what areas interest you most and will be valuable to your career, don't just do a course for the sake of it. The best IT people (or people in any discipline for that matter) are those that are doing something that they are genuinely interested in and is in demand. If for example working with databases is something that you find interesting, invest time and effort learning those technologies. Buy books, watch tutorials, but most importantly try and get as much hands on experience as you can and constantly try and improve the way you do it.

The certification really only helps in companies that lack the ability to properly assess the ability of a candidate, they instead rely on ticking boxes. Such hiring is often done by HR departments that have no idea about the real skills needed.
ministrymason23/03/2020 22:37

Surly it proves their ability to learn and you combine it with practical …Surly it proves their ability to learn and you combine it with practical work experience. Are you saying to never take any certification? Theyre good for learning new skills or proving you know a specific area in detail.


No not really, it only shows their ability to retain information required to pass a test. At an interview I often ask a candidate something completely outside their area of expertise. Why? to see how they would approach the problem. If I ask a Microsoft SQL Server DBA how do your rollback an SQL transaction then all I know is that they can perform that task. I want to know how they respond when they are faced with something they have not experienced before. What happens when new technologies are introduced, can this person adapt to these changes or can they only perform the tasks they have been shown how to do?
Edited by: "Going_Digital" 24th Mar
Going_Digital24/03/2020 11:53

No not really, it only shows their ability to retain information required …No not really, it only shows their ability to retain information required to pass a test. At an interview I often ask a candidate something completely outside their area of expertise. Why? to see how they would approach the problem. If I ask a Microsoft SQL Server DBA how do your rollback an SQL transaction then all I know is that they can perform that task. I want to know how they respond when they are faced with something they have not experienced before. What happens when new technologies are introduced, can this person adapt to these changes or can they only perform the tasks they have been shown how to do?


Yes but to right them off because of a qualification. Seems ridiculous
Going_Digital24/03/2020 11:36

Well said, essentially what I meant is that these kinds of certifications …Well said, essentially what I meant is that these kinds of certifications are of no interest to me as an employer. I wouldn't not employ someone just because they had them, but the point is I completely ignore them. I am not interested in someone's ability to remember enough stuff to pass a test. I am interested in someone with good problem solving skills and an aptitude for technical things.In my experience, those that hold these certifications are not the same sort of people as those with the ability to understand things. It is fine that you learnt on the course that editing some registry value will do something, but I can find that on google.It is the same with schools, poor schools teach you facts and figures that you can recite at exam time. Good schools teach you how to think critically for yourself and get to the answer using a logical approach.So in essence, I should have said these kinds of qualifications are meaningless to me when I am employing IT people.


I get what you're saying but I'm not so sure. I do for Microsoft certs to a large extent but for others maybe not. As an example, I work with guys that are certified to the hilt (CCIEs for example), and most are excellent at what they do. Some people can do it, some can't. I don't think it's completely fair to say that people with certs can't understand things as well as those without. I do take your point though.
darraghdie23/03/2020 21:27

IT admin here for the past 3 years but with no certs, any recommondations …IT admin here for the past 3 years but with no certs, any recommondations on which one to take? Been meaning to do one for a while and love 40% off


I've been in IT 7 years and am by far no expert, but I'd personally say a certification to prove that you understand the fundamentals of something and can learn is definitely useful. Especially if you can go into an interview being able to say you are weak in something and are addressing it by learning and taking an exam to prove you can do it.

I'd say networking is useful in most situations, dependant on your specific role in IT. Microsoft 70-741 is there but there's always comptia network+, CCNA 200-301 or Microsoft 98-366 as well for options if you want to be a bit more general.
I'm personally starting some Microsoft 365 courses to help get my head around more basics on that.
Going_Digital24/03/2020 11:38

There are plenty of useless politicians that have been in their jobs for …There are plenty of useless politicians that have been in their jobs for more than 20 years, so length of tenure is no indication of quality.


If you think progressing to a dev after 20 years of technical networking experience is isomorphic to the career progression a "useless politician" then the incompetence of your previous stance is starting to make sense and you'd better stop reading the daily mail before you brain makes any more ridiculous theories (with which to hide your ignorance of the issues) that add nothing to the debate.

1: Accredited certificates can prove highly valuable for many reasons, either working, learning or hiring.

2: Try replacing ignorance with insight and make the world a better place.
Going_Digital24/03/2020 11:36

Well said, essentially what I meant is that these kinds of certifications …Well said, essentially what I meant is that these kinds of certifications are of no interest to me as an employer. I wouldn't not employ someone just because they had them, but the point is I completely ignore them. I am not interested in someone's ability to remember enough stuff to pass a test. I am interested in someone with good problem solving skills and an aptitude for technical things.In my experience, those that hold these certifications are not the same sort of people as those with the ability to understand things. It is fine that you learnt on the course that editing some registry value will do something, but I can find that on google.It is the same with schools, poor schools teach you facts and figures that you can recite at exam time. Good schools teach you how to think critically for yourself and get to the answer using a logical approach.So in essence, I should have said these kinds of qualifications are meaningless to me when I am employing IT people.


I don't know where you got the idea that people who have these tend not to be the people with an aptitude for technology, but having dealt with multiple large scale companies (some of the largest in the uk/multinational) in IT from systems to development, security and everywhere else.
I can tell you most, (and higher up, the vast majority of technical staff) have these, so I really don't know how much experiance you have, but I can't believe this in anyway as most employers require this (and will put you through it anyway if you don't have it if nothing else for the purpose to be certified for the clients).



The below is solely on the comments that you completley ignore these courses, not that they should be the deciding factor (which I agree with).

This may well work for someone with plenty of experiance for an experianced role. But unless you don't employ anyone without experiance, there's a problem where if everyone acted this way, no one would ever get a job.

How's someone supposed to use a logical approach if they don't at least have a core understanding of the basic principles?
You may be able to Google network troubleshooting tips, but having a basic knowledge would help you avoid coming up with some garbage answer like "use the automatic network troubleshooter", which may work at home, but likely bring down a whole commercial domain network.

If you take everything available on Google as gospel then you've a crisis waiting to happen.

I can't see how your way of thinking is anywhere near logical unless you don't employ people who aren't experienced (who are going to be the ones who are wondering about these qualifications and considering taking them).

Meaning all your post is going to do is dissuade people against taking these when you probably wouldn't employ them anyway.

I wouldn't refuse to employ someone who didn't have any qualifications, but you not understanding how two beginners, one with a self taught qualification relevant to your vacancy, and the other without, has one clear winner, then that itself is illogical.


Those with experiance know how it works, keep your relationships with colleagues and clients and knowing your experience and work ethic will be your best option for climbing up the job brackets

To those with no experience, these will definatley give you an edge, but experiance does trump all, and if any potential employer doesn't understand this, then you really don't want to work for them in this field.


Personally I'd prefer these over a degree, as someone whose gone down both avenues, along with multiple others. I got more core knowledge and use from these than in my degree. And they are a fraction of the price. But you do have to be comfortable in stressful situations and problem solving.

Ultimately, its down to the individual employer and what they value, but that doesn't mean they're right, do what you can do, there is no course for experiance. Get your foot in the door (preferably at a small firm/not at a call centre). And work from there. These will definatley help with a lot of employers who may ask you some baseline questions (most do), after you get the job, then the real work begins.
has anybody managed to book an exam using the discount code in the UK?
Almost out of date bread! I say save the 60% and get the new certs. Remember its not just the cash its the study time too
Work experience > Certs.
I have worked with a bunch of knobs at various points in my career who lack common sense, professionalism, timeliness ( SLA/OLA) and most importantly responsibility.
thanks, always good to get these
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