Oscillating Upright Fan Heater 2.4kW.£12.66 @ Argos - HotUKDeals
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Oscillating Upright Fan Heater 2.4kW.£12.66 @ Argos

BadBeatDuke Avatar
6y, 10m agoFound 6 years, 10 months ago
Was looking for a fan heater for my boys room so i dont have to have the heating on and noticed this, got some decent reviews too.

# 2 heat settings.

# 4 position rotary switch: off/fan/low(1200w) or high (2400w).

# Variable thermostat with thermostatic temperature control.

# Frost protection.

# Safety cut out function.

# Power on indicator.

# Oscillating base.

# Exposed cord length 1.6m.

# Tip over switch.

# Size (H)36, (W)16, (D)22.5 cm.
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#1
weird, I was just looking at this exact model as our boiler has died but its out of stock at my local Argos.

Seems like a good price though!
#2
Hot or cool? :whistling:
#3
No stock near me, which is a real pity, as I'd have snapped it up.

Hopefully other peeps will be more successful.
#4
I got one of these just before Xmas and I can confirm it is a fantastic piece of kit for the money. The thermostat and oscillation features are a godsend. Heats the place up in no time! Hot!

http://deconstructedchristian.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/hot_sun.png?w=240&h=233
#5
just reserved one heat added will have too see how much it costs to run
#6
linw
just reserved one heat added will have too see how much it costs to run


It's easy to work out if you know how much you pay for your elec.
It will be around 10p a kwh
therefore it will cost 12p an hour on 1200w setting, 24p on the 2400w setting.
#7
These normally come with 400w to 800w settings.

Better off buying a oil filled radiator for around 20 quid from wilkinson, they use about the same electricity as this one and do a better job.

I would only consider these if it uses upto 500w, anything more than that and its just not worth it.

Besides the economical flaws, this is also not good as it dries all the moisture in the room.You have to keep a bowl of water in the room to prevent this.
#8
laldude
These normally come with 400w to 800w settings.

Better off buying a oil filled radiator for around 20 quid from wilkinson, they use about the same electricity as this one and do a better job.

I would only consider these if it uses upto 500w, anything more than that and its just not worth it.

Besides the economical flaws, this is also not good as it dries all the moisture in the room.You have to keep a bowl of water in the room to prevent this.


If a heater uses 1 kW, it puts out 1 kW of heat regardless of the type of heater. If a heater is "cheaper to run" then it's not giving out as much heat.
#9
johnnypanic
No stock near me, which is a real pity, as I'd have snapped it up.

Hopefully other peeps will be more successful.


in the 5 closest stores near me there was 2 in stock, one in Bullwell (which i've reserved) and one in Beeston
1 Like #10
Thanks. Looks like no end to this cold snap so reserved 1 from Castle Vale store Birmingham. Only 2 left now.
#12
Ha! Funny I see this on here today as we just got one of these 2 days ago (cos of the price!) And I love it!

(I call it Pingu cos it looks like a penguin when its on and it with its 'eye' dials and orange 'beak! light in between) lol! :w00t::-D

Fab heater though! A truly great buy we think, highly recommended and seems there is stock avail still. (North Manchester area)

Heat added!
#13
BadBeatDuke
in the 5 closest stores near me there was 2 in stock, one in Bullwell (which i've reserved) and one in Beeston


You will think it's great, trust me :thumbsup:

xx
#14
blobbyrob
Thanks. Looks like no end to this cold snap so reserved 1 from Castle Vale store Birmingham. Only 2 left now.


Nice one, reserved the last one at castle vale!:thumbsup:
#15
Reserved the last one at Sunderland Hylton, thanks very much.
#16
Thanks for posting - ordered from Milton Keynes (now showing 2 in stock)
#17
I got this a few years ago and it's still going strong, heats a room up quickly, what more do you need?!?!!?
#18
pghstochaj
If a heater uses 1 kW, it puts out 1 kW of heat regardless of the type of heater. If a heater is "cheaper to run" then it's not giving out as much heat.


But its not possible for 100% efficiency and to achieve the same kW heat output they could consume more electricity and therefore cost more money to run. Additionally different types of heaters take different amounts of time and therefore money to heat up to the required temperature. I was always under the (perhaps misguided?) impression that electric fan heaters use power to heat the element and power to spin the fan and are less efficient than other forms of electric heater. Perhaps this short article might be useful for those in the market for a portable heater: http://www.which.co.uk/reviews/portable-heaters/page/features-explained/
#19
kingosticks
But its not possible for 100% efficiency and to achieve the same kW heat output they could consume more electricity and therefore cost more money to run. Additionally different types of heaters take different amounts of time and therefore money to heat up to the required temperature. I was always under the (perhaps misguided?) impression that electric fan heaters use power to heat the element and power to spin the fan and are less efficient than other forms of electric heater. Perhaps this short article might be useful for those in the market for a portable heater: http://www.which.co.uk/reviews/portable-heaters/page/features-explained/


Go on, if it's not (nearly) 100% efficient, where are the losses? Why would one heater be more or less efficient than another if both are using electricity and a heating element.

Time taken to get up to temperature and lose the temperature is irrelevant, the electricity is still converted into heat and is still output at some point during the cycle.

You have identified the one point at which a fan heater is seemingly less efficient, it uses electrical energy to rotate the fan (forced convection) whilst an oil filled radiator uses natural convection only. The electricity is converted into mechanical, heat and sound energy, but what does the mechanical and sound energy end up as?

Finally, although the temperature in a room may not be increased equally if a 1.9 kW heater fan or 2 kW heater were to be used, forced convection will alter the convective heat transfer coefficient of a person and therefore the perception may be different. Compare that to putting your hand in the centre of your oven at 200degC vs. putting your hand infront of your car heating vent at maximum temperature.
#20
Might grab one if it will fill the room with heat within an hour or so, and be more cost effective than the Electric Fireplace.
#21
pghstochaj
Go on, if it's not (nearly) 100% efficient, where are the losses? Why would one heater be more or less efficient than another if both are using electricity and a heating element.

Time taken to get up to temperature and lose the temperature is irrelevant, the electricity is still converted into heat and is still output at some point during the cycle.

You have identified the one point at which a fan heater is seemingly less efficient, it uses electrical energy to rotate the fan (forced convection) whilst an oil filled radiator uses natural convection only. The electricity is converted into mechanical, heat and sound energy, but what does the mechanical and sound energy end up as?

Finally, although the temperature in a room may not be increased equally if a 1.9 kW heater fan or 2 kW heater were to be used, forced convection will alter the convective heat transfer coefficient of a person and therefore the perception may be different. Compare that to putting your hand in the centre of your oven at 200degC vs. putting your hand infront of your car heating vent at maximum temperature.

You are of course right, it will all turn into heat in the end, although this may not be useful when the fan is directed at a specific area/person. And what if its on for a short amount of time? Wouldnt the time to heat up be quite important? What if I want to make my time in the room bareable and then turn the heater off?

Ive never used an electric oil radiator but I was under the impression they heated the oil slowly and then turned off and then only come back on again when the temperature of the oil drops back down again. Inst the heating element on for less time and therefore cheaper in the long run?

I'm just saying that you should consider what you want the heater for before buying a specific type.

Oh, and also, is there anything advantageous about halogen heaters?
#22
The idea of the heating circuit turning on and off doesn't change the efficiency, just the amount of energy output from the system and likewise, the time to heat up or cool down doesn't change the efficiency, it simply changes the time of the heat output.

For example, if a 1 kW electric heater is on for an hour non-stop (no thermostat), it will put out near enough 1 kW * 1 hr (1 kWhr) of heat. This will cause a fixed temperature rise in the room given by Q = MCpdT where:
Q is the energy output (which is almost the same as electricity used in this case);
M is the mass of air you are heating up (well, nearly, it should be the total mass of the room or whatever boundary you have selected);
Cp is the specific heat capacity of the air you are heating up (again, nearly, if you used the total mass of the room this should be the average Cp for the entire boundary contents); and
dT is the change in temperature realised.

If however you have a thermostat based oil radiator (or convector heater, or fan heater etc.) of say 1 kW, the unit would have to be constantly on during the same hour to meet the same temperature rise, or, a 2 kW unit would have to be on for 30 minutes in total to meet the same temperature rise etc.

You do address an important point; how quickly do you want the heater to be available? An oil filled radiator is an indirect heat source since the electrical heating element heats the oil which then heats the room (via the metal surface, a further intermediate). This means that before any heat is exported, you need to do the Q = MCpdT on the heating oil and then on the metal casing. A convector heater heats the air directly which initially sounds like it should be quicker. It isn't that simple however because of the second important equation, Q = UAdT.

Halogen heaters are slightly different. They give out some energy (I presume) as IR from the electromagnetic spectrum. This may allow heat to be directed somewhat better but the total amount of heat created will still be the same as a traditional heater, it might be possible for you to feel warmer but the total amount of heat exported into the boundary would be the same.

As an aside, we are all pushed by various groups, and now legislation, to get rid of our silly 100 W bulbs which work at about 2% efficiency. Fantastic, except now during the majority of the year we have to have our heating on more to account for the lower levels of heat from our lighting. Hmm.

kingosticks
You are of course right, it will all turn into heat in the end, although this may not be useful when the fan is directed at a specific area/person. And what if its on for a short amount of time? Wouldnt the time to heat up be quite important? What if I want to make my time in the room bareable and then turn the heater off?

Ive never used an electric oil radiator but I was under the impression they heated the oil slowly and then turned off and then only come back on again when the temperature of the oil drops back down again. Inst the heating element on for less time and therefore cheaper in the long run?

I'm just saying that you should consider what you want the heater for before buying a specific type.

Oh, and also, is there anything advantageous about halogen heaters?
#23
pghstochaj
The idea of the heating circuit turning on and off doesn't change the efficiency, just the amount of energy output from the system and likewise, the time to heat up or cool down doesn't change the efficiency, it simply changes the time of the heat output.

For example, if a 1 kW electric heater is on for an hour non-stop (no thermostat), it will put out near enough 1 kW * 1 hr (1 kWhr) of heat. This will cause a fixed temperature rise in the room given by Q = MCpdT where:
Q is the energy output (which is almost the same as electricity used in this case);
M is the mass of air you are heating up (well, nearly, it should be the total mass of the room or whatever boundary you have selected);
Cp is the specific heat capacity of the air you are heating up (again, nearly, if you used the total mass of the room this should be the average Cp for the entire boundary contents); and
dT is the change in temperature realised.

If however you have a thermostat based oil radiator (or convector heater, or fan heater etc.) of say 1 kW, the unit would have to be constantly on during the same hour to meet the same temperature rise, or, a 2 kW unit would have to be on for 30 minutes in total to meet the same temperature rise etc.

You do address an important point; how quickly do you want the heater to be available? An oil filled radiator is an indirect heat source since the electrical heating element heats the oil which then heats the room (via the metal surface, a further intermediate). This means that before any heat is exported, you need to do the Q = MCpdT on the heating oil and then on the metal casing. A convector heater heats the air directly which initially sounds like it should be quicker. It isn't that simple however because of the second important equation, Q = UAdT.

Halogen heaters are slightly different. They give out some energy (I presume) as IR from the electromagnetic spectrum. This may allow heat to be directed somewhat better but the total amount of heat created will still be the same as a traditional heater, it might be possible for you to feel warmer but the total amount of heat exported into the boundary would be the same.

As an aside, we are all pushed by various groups, and now legislation, to get rid of our silly 100 W bulbs which work at about 2% efficiency. Fantastic, except now during the majority of the year we have to have our heating on more to account for the lower levels of heat from our lighting. Hmm.


But isn't it worth having low energy light bulbs because we will save energy in the summer?
#24
Great little heater, bought one for my teenage daughters room just before xmas - warms up fast and takes chill off - safety cut out and termostat. Bonus it will also acts as a cooler fan in the summer :-)
#25
UK_Kat
Great little heater, bought one for my teenage daughters room just before xmas - warms up fast and takes chill off - safety cut out and termostat. Bonus it will also acts as a cooler fan in the summer :-)


That it does! Another great factor and another reason why we bought this particular one! (Price was 1st reason!)

Well chuffed with it and only had it a few days too :thumbsup:

xx
#26
maddoglewis
But isn't it worth having low energy light bulbs because we will save energy in the summer?


Depends on the energy used in manufacture and whether it is sufficiently offset.
#27
out of stock i my local area Barnsley, Rotherham
#28
Picked mine up today abd gave it a blast, very happy with it
#29
None left in my area
#30
Picked mine up today. Not very impressed. Unpleasant smell when on and not very hot. Probably take it back tomorrow.
#31
Ivor
Picked mine up today. Not very impressed. Unpleasant smell when on and not very hot. Probably take it back tomorrow.

:? smell goes after 10 min or so, like explained. also i had on for 15 in kids room and made it too hot. Very impressed
#32
Mine didn't. Kept it on for several hours and the smell lingered. In it's favour it is very quiet but it's going back. Worth a try though.
#33
just received email from ARGOS today confirming that its now back in stock. none to be had locally so ordered it for home delivery.
#34
Just got one from the Argos in Loughborough, theres still one left there. It's working great :) I'm as toasty as a toasted thing.
#35
Price has now increased to £18.99 from today
#36
Price is back up to normal. On the day I was going to buy one too....

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